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Parenthood and host resistance to the common cold.
Psychosom Med 2012 Jul-Aug; 74(6):567-73PM

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether parenthood predicts host resistance to the common cold among healthy volunteers experimentally exposed to a common cold virus.

METHODS

Participants were 795 healthy volunteers (age range = 18-55 years) enrolled in one of three viral-challenge studies conducted from 1993 to 2004. After reporting parenthood status, participants were quarantined, administered nasal drops containing one of four common cold viruses, and monitored for the development of a clinical cold (infection in the presence of objective signs of illness) on the day before and for 5 to 6 days after exposure. All analyses included controls for immunity to the experimental virus (prechallenge specific antibody titers), viral strain, season, age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, body mass, study, employment status, and education.

RESULTS

Parents were less likely to develop colds than nonparents were (odds ratio [OR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31-0.73). This was true for both parents with one to two children (OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.33-0.83) and three or more children (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.22-0.70). Parenthood was associated with a decreased risk of colds for both those with at least one child living at home (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.24-0.87) and those whose children all lived away from home (OR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.12-0.60). The relationship between parenthood and colds was not observed in parents aged 18 to 24 years but was pronounced among older parents.

CONCLUSIONS

Parenthood was associated with greater host resistance to common cold viruses.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA. rsneed@andrew.cmu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22773866

Citation

Sneed, Rodlescia S., et al. "Parenthood and Host Resistance to the Common Cold." Psychosomatic Medicine, vol. 74, no. 6, 2012, pp. 567-73.
Sneed RS, Cohen S, Turner RB, et al. Parenthood and host resistance to the common cold. Psychosom Med. 2012;74(6):567-73.
Sneed, R. S., Cohen, S., Turner, R. B., & Doyle, W. J. (2012). Parenthood and host resistance to the common cold. Psychosomatic Medicine, 74(6), pp. 567-73. doi:10.1097/PSY.0b013e31825941ff.
Sneed RS, et al. Parenthood and Host Resistance to the Common Cold. Psychosom Med. 2012;74(6):567-73. PubMed PMID: 22773866.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parenthood and host resistance to the common cold. AU - Sneed,Rodlescia S, AU - Cohen,Sheldon, AU - Turner,Ronald B, AU - Doyle,William J, PY - 2012/7/10/entrez PY - 2012/7/10/pubmed PY - 2012/12/10/medline SP - 567 EP - 73 JF - Psychosomatic medicine JO - Psychosom Med VL - 74 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To determine whether parenthood predicts host resistance to the common cold among healthy volunteers experimentally exposed to a common cold virus. METHODS: Participants were 795 healthy volunteers (age range = 18-55 years) enrolled in one of three viral-challenge studies conducted from 1993 to 2004. After reporting parenthood status, participants were quarantined, administered nasal drops containing one of four common cold viruses, and monitored for the development of a clinical cold (infection in the presence of objective signs of illness) on the day before and for 5 to 6 days after exposure. All analyses included controls for immunity to the experimental virus (prechallenge specific antibody titers), viral strain, season, age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, body mass, study, employment status, and education. RESULTS: Parents were less likely to develop colds than nonparents were (odds ratio [OR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.31-0.73). This was true for both parents with one to two children (OR = 0.52, 95% CI = 0.33-0.83) and three or more children (OR = 0.39, 95% CI = 0.22-0.70). Parenthood was associated with a decreased risk of colds for both those with at least one child living at home (OR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.24-0.87) and those whose children all lived away from home (OR = 0.27, 95% CI = 0.12-0.60). The relationship between parenthood and colds was not observed in parents aged 18 to 24 years but was pronounced among older parents. CONCLUSIONS: Parenthood was associated with greater host resistance to common cold viruses. SN - 1534-7796 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22773866/Parenthood_and_host_resistance_to_the_common_cold_ L2 - http://Insights.ovid.com/pubmed?pmid=22773866 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -