Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients.
AIDS. 2012 Sep 24; 26(15):1917-26.AIDS

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined.

METHODS

Patients with at least three serum creatinine measurements after 1 January 2004 and known HCV antibody status were included. Baseline was defined as the first eligible estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (Cockcroft-Gault equation), and CKD was either a confirmed (>3 months apart) eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less for patients with a baseline eGFR more than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or a confirmed 25% decline in eGFR for patients with a baseline eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less. Incidence rates of CKD were compared between HCV groups (anti-HCV-negative, anti-HCV-positive with or without viremia) using Poisson regression.

RESULTS

Of 8235 patients with known anti-HCV status, 2052 (24.9%) were anti-HCV-positive of whom 983 (47.9%) were HCV-RNA-positive, 193 (9.4%) HCV-RNA-negative and 876 (42.7%) had unknown HCV-RNA. At baseline, the median eGFR was 97.6 (interquartile range 83.8-113.0) ml/min per 1.73 m. During 36123 person-years of follow-up (PYFU), 495 patients progressed to CKD (6.0%) with an incidence rate of 14.5 per 1000 PYFU (95% confidence interval 12.5-14.9). In a multivariate Poisson model, patients who were anti-HCV-positive with HCV viremia had a higher incidence rate of CKD, whereas patients with cleared HCV infection had a similar incidence rate of CKD compared with anti-HCV-negative patients. There was no association between CKD and HCV genotype.

CONCLUSION

Compared with HIV-monoinfected patients, HIV-positive patients with chronic rather than cleared HCV infection were at increased risk of developing CKD, suggesting a contribution from active HCV infection toward the pathogenesis of CKD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Copenhagen HIV Programme, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. lpe@cphiv.dkNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22781222

Citation

Peters, Lars, et al. "Hepatitis C Virus Viremia Increases the Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in HIV-infected Patients." AIDS (London, England), vol. 26, no. 15, 2012, pp. 1917-26.
Peters L, Grint D, Lundgren JD, et al. Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients. AIDS. 2012;26(15):1917-26.
Peters, L., Grint, D., Lundgren, J. D., Rockstroh, J. K., Soriano, V., Reiss, P., Grzeszczuk, A., Sambatakou, H., Mocroft, A., & Kirk, O. (2012). Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients. AIDS (London, England), 26(15), 1917-26.
Peters L, et al. Hepatitis C Virus Viremia Increases the Incidence of Chronic Kidney Disease in HIV-infected Patients. AIDS. 2012 Sep 24;26(15):1917-26. PubMed PMID: 22781222.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hepatitis C virus viremia increases the incidence of chronic kidney disease in HIV-infected patients. AU - Peters,Lars, AU - Grint,Daniel, AU - Lundgren,Jens D, AU - Rockstroh,Jürgen K, AU - Soriano,Vincent, AU - Reiss,Peter, AU - Grzeszczuk,Anna, AU - Sambatakou,Helen, AU - Mocroft,Amanda, AU - Kirk,Ole, AU - ,, PY - 2012/7/12/entrez PY - 2012/7/12/pubmed PY - 2013/3/5/medline SP - 1917 EP - 26 JF - AIDS (London, England) JO - AIDS VL - 26 IS - 15 N2 - BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported on an association between hepatitis C virus (HCV) antibody status and the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD), but the role of HCV viremia and genotype are not well defined. METHODS: Patients with at least three serum creatinine measurements after 1 January 2004 and known HCV antibody status were included. Baseline was defined as the first eligible estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (Cockcroft-Gault equation), and CKD was either a confirmed (>3 months apart) eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less for patients with a baseline eGFR more than 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or a confirmed 25% decline in eGFR for patients with a baseline eGFR of 60 ml/min per 1.73 m or less. Incidence rates of CKD were compared between HCV groups (anti-HCV-negative, anti-HCV-positive with or without viremia) using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Of 8235 patients with known anti-HCV status, 2052 (24.9%) were anti-HCV-positive of whom 983 (47.9%) were HCV-RNA-positive, 193 (9.4%) HCV-RNA-negative and 876 (42.7%) had unknown HCV-RNA. At baseline, the median eGFR was 97.6 (interquartile range 83.8-113.0) ml/min per 1.73 m. During 36123 person-years of follow-up (PYFU), 495 patients progressed to CKD (6.0%) with an incidence rate of 14.5 per 1000 PYFU (95% confidence interval 12.5-14.9). In a multivariate Poisson model, patients who were anti-HCV-positive with HCV viremia had a higher incidence rate of CKD, whereas patients with cleared HCV infection had a similar incidence rate of CKD compared with anti-HCV-negative patients. There was no association between CKD and HCV genotype. CONCLUSION: Compared with HIV-monoinfected patients, HIV-positive patients with chronic rather than cleared HCV infection were at increased risk of developing CKD, suggesting a contribution from active HCV infection toward the pathogenesis of CKD. SN - 1473-5571 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22781222/Hepatitis_C_virus_viremia_increases_the_incidence_of_chronic_kidney_disease_in_HIV_infected_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0b013e3283574e71 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -