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Maximum rate of pressure development and maximal relaxation rate of respiratory muscles in patients with cystic fibrosis.
Respir Care. 2013 Mar; 58(3):474-81.RC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Respiratory muscle function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been studied by measurement of maximal inspiratory pressure (P(Imax)), maximal expiratory pressure (P(Emax)), and the pressure-time index of the respiratory muscles (PTI(mus)). The maximum rate of pressure development (MRPD) during P(Imax) (MRPD-P(Imax)), MRPD during P(Emax) (MRPD-P(Emax)), maximal relaxation rate (MRR) during P(Imax) (MRR-P(imax)), and MRR during P(Emax) (MRR-P(Emax)) have not been studied in CF. Our aim was to study MRPD and MRR and investigate their possible application as accessory indices of respiratory muscle function in patients with CF.

METHODS

FEVY, FVC, and maximal expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity, body mass index (BMI), upper arm muscle area, P(imax), P(Emax), PTI(mus), MRPD-P(Imax), MRPD-P(Emax), MRR-P(imax), and MRR-P(Emax) were assessed in 123 CF patients and in a control group of 123 healthy subjects matched for age and sex.

RESULTS

MRR-P(Emax) was significantly increased and MRPD-P(Emax) was significantly decreased in the CF patients, compared to the healthy controls. In the CF patients MRR-P(Imax) was significantly related to PTI(mus) (P = .02), FEV1 (P = .03), FVC (P = .001), BMI (P < .001), and upper arm muscle area (P < .001). In the CF patients, MRPD-P(Imax) and MRPD- P(Emax) were significantly related to upper arm muscle area (P < .001), BMI (P < .001 and P = .01, respectively), P(Imax) (P < .001), and P(Emax) (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS

The CF patients exhibited increased MRR and decreased MRPD during maximal respiratory effort, compared to controls. The differences in MRR-P(imax) and MRPD-P(Imax) between the controls and the complete group of CF patients were not significant. MRPD and MRR were significantly related to nutritional and pulmonary function impairment in CF patients. MRPD strongly correlated to maximal respiratory muscle pressures, and MRR strongly correlated to PTI(mus) in patients with CF. These findings suggest that CF patients are at increased risk of respiratory muscle fatigue. Regular determination of MRPD and MRR may be clinically useful in CF patients and help to initiate inspiratory muscle training and noninvasive ventilation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals, National Health Service Foundation Trust, Cambridge, United Kingdom. tdassios@upatras.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22781492

Citation

Dassios, Theodore G., et al. "Maximum Rate of Pressure Development and Maximal Relaxation Rate of Respiratory Muscles in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis." Respiratory Care, vol. 58, no. 3, 2013, pp. 474-81.
Dassios TG, Doudounakis S, Dimitriou G. Maximum rate of pressure development and maximal relaxation rate of respiratory muscles in patients with cystic fibrosis. Respir Care. 2013;58(3):474-81.
Dassios, T. G., Doudounakis, S., & Dimitriou, G. (2013). Maximum rate of pressure development and maximal relaxation rate of respiratory muscles in patients with cystic fibrosis. Respiratory Care, 58(3), 474-81.
Dassios TG, Doudounakis S, Dimitriou G. Maximum Rate of Pressure Development and Maximal Relaxation Rate of Respiratory Muscles in Patients With Cystic Fibrosis. Respir Care. 2013;58(3):474-81. PubMed PMID: 22781492.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Maximum rate of pressure development and maximal relaxation rate of respiratory muscles in patients with cystic fibrosis. AU - Dassios,Theodore G, AU - Doudounakis,Stavros, AU - Dimitriou,Gabriel, PY - 2012/7/12/entrez PY - 2012/7/12/pubmed PY - 2014/2/22/medline SP - 474 EP - 81 JF - Respiratory care JO - Respir Care VL - 58 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Respiratory muscle function in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has been studied by measurement of maximal inspiratory pressure (P(Imax)), maximal expiratory pressure (P(Emax)), and the pressure-time index of the respiratory muscles (PTI(mus)). The maximum rate of pressure development (MRPD) during P(Imax) (MRPD-P(Imax)), MRPD during P(Emax) (MRPD-P(Emax)), maximal relaxation rate (MRR) during P(Imax) (MRR-P(imax)), and MRR during P(Emax) (MRR-P(Emax)) have not been studied in CF. Our aim was to study MRPD and MRR and investigate their possible application as accessory indices of respiratory muscle function in patients with CF. METHODS: FEVY, FVC, and maximal expiratory flow between 25% and 75% of vital capacity, body mass index (BMI), upper arm muscle area, P(imax), P(Emax), PTI(mus), MRPD-P(Imax), MRPD-P(Emax), MRR-P(imax), and MRR-P(Emax) were assessed in 123 CF patients and in a control group of 123 healthy subjects matched for age and sex. RESULTS: MRR-P(Emax) was significantly increased and MRPD-P(Emax) was significantly decreased in the CF patients, compared to the healthy controls. In the CF patients MRR-P(Imax) was significantly related to PTI(mus) (P = .02), FEV1 (P = .03), FVC (P = .001), BMI (P < .001), and upper arm muscle area (P < .001). In the CF patients, MRPD-P(Imax) and MRPD- P(Emax) were significantly related to upper arm muscle area (P < .001), BMI (P < .001 and P = .01, respectively), P(Imax) (P < .001), and P(Emax) (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: The CF patients exhibited increased MRR and decreased MRPD during maximal respiratory effort, compared to controls. The differences in MRR-P(imax) and MRPD-P(Imax) between the controls and the complete group of CF patients were not significant. MRPD and MRR were significantly related to nutritional and pulmonary function impairment in CF patients. MRPD strongly correlated to maximal respiratory muscle pressures, and MRR strongly correlated to PTI(mus) in patients with CF. These findings suggest that CF patients are at increased risk of respiratory muscle fatigue. Regular determination of MRPD and MRR may be clinically useful in CF patients and help to initiate inspiratory muscle training and noninvasive ventilation. SN - 1943-3654 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22781492/Maximum_rate_of_pressure_development_and_maximal_relaxation_rate_of_respiratory_muscles_in_patients_with_cystic_fibrosis_ L2 - http://rc.rcjournal.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=short&amp;pmid=22781492 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -