Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Exploring the relationship between religious service attendance, mental disorders, and suicidality among different ethnic groups: results from a nationally representative survey.
Depress Anxiety. 2012 Nov; 29(11):983-90.DA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To date, sufficient data have not been available to examine ethnic differences in religiosity and mental health in the general population. However, evidence exists to suggest that the protective effects of religion may differ across ethnic groups. This study examined the relationship between religious attendance and mental health across ethnic groups.

METHODS

The Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiologic Survey (N = 20,130) is a large, ethnically diverse sample of adult, US respondents. Frequency of attendance at religious services was measured as: at least once per week (reference group), one to three times per month, less than once per month, or less than once per year. Multiple logistic regression analyses examined associations between religious attendance and mood, anxiety and substance use disorders, as well as suicidal ideation and attempts. Models adjusted for sociodemographics and comorbidity.

RESULTS

Results differed when performed within each ethnicity. Infrequent religious attendance was associated with substance use disorders in Whites and Africans only (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.30 [95% CI = 1.77-2.99]; AOR = 1.86 [1.25-2.79], respectively), and with anxiety and suicidal ideation in Whites (AOR = 1.44 [1.10-1.88]; AOR = 1.58 [1.24-2.01]) and Hispanics only (AOR = 2.35 [1.17-4.73]; AOR = 1.70 [1.15-2.52]). Asians were the only group in which religious attendance was associated with mood disorders (AOR = 4.90 [1.54-15.60]). Interaction terms were nonsignificant.

CONCLUSIONS

The present study suggests that ethnicity is an important variable to consider in the relationship between religiosity and mental health. Future studies should attempt to either adjust for or stratify by ethnicity when examining these relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada. jenrobinson1@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22786758

Citation

Robinson, Jennifer A., et al. "Exploring the Relationship Between Religious Service Attendance, Mental Disorders, and Suicidality Among Different Ethnic Groups: Results From a Nationally Representative Survey." Depression and Anxiety, vol. 29, no. 11, 2012, pp. 983-90.
Robinson JA, Bolton JM, Rasic D, et al. Exploring the relationship between religious service attendance, mental disorders, and suicidality among different ethnic groups: results from a nationally representative survey. Depress Anxiety. 2012;29(11):983-90.
Robinson, J. A., Bolton, J. M., Rasic, D., & Sareen, J. (2012). Exploring the relationship between religious service attendance, mental disorders, and suicidality among different ethnic groups: results from a nationally representative survey. Depression and Anxiety, 29(11), 983-90. https://doi.org/10.1002/da.21978
Robinson JA, et al. Exploring the Relationship Between Religious Service Attendance, Mental Disorders, and Suicidality Among Different Ethnic Groups: Results From a Nationally Representative Survey. Depress Anxiety. 2012;29(11):983-90. PubMed PMID: 22786758.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exploring the relationship between religious service attendance, mental disorders, and suicidality among different ethnic groups: results from a nationally representative survey. AU - Robinson,Jennifer A, AU - Bolton,James M, AU - Rasic,Daniel, AU - Sareen,Jitender, Y1 - 2012/07/11/ PY - 2012/02/06/received PY - 2012/06/03/revised PY - 2012/06/09/accepted PY - 2012/7/13/entrez PY - 2012/7/13/pubmed PY - 2013/4/23/medline SP - 983 EP - 90 JF - Depression and anxiety JO - Depress Anxiety VL - 29 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: To date, sufficient data have not been available to examine ethnic differences in religiosity and mental health in the general population. However, evidence exists to suggest that the protective effects of religion may differ across ethnic groups. This study examined the relationship between religious attendance and mental health across ethnic groups. METHODS: The Collaborative Psychiatric Epidemiologic Survey (N = 20,130) is a large, ethnically diverse sample of adult, US respondents. Frequency of attendance at religious services was measured as: at least once per week (reference group), one to three times per month, less than once per month, or less than once per year. Multiple logistic regression analyses examined associations between religious attendance and mood, anxiety and substance use disorders, as well as suicidal ideation and attempts. Models adjusted for sociodemographics and comorbidity. RESULTS: Results differed when performed within each ethnicity. Infrequent religious attendance was associated with substance use disorders in Whites and Africans only (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR) = 2.30 [95% CI = 1.77-2.99]; AOR = 1.86 [1.25-2.79], respectively), and with anxiety and suicidal ideation in Whites (AOR = 1.44 [1.10-1.88]; AOR = 1.58 [1.24-2.01]) and Hispanics only (AOR = 2.35 [1.17-4.73]; AOR = 1.70 [1.15-2.52]). Asians were the only group in which religious attendance was associated with mood disorders (AOR = 4.90 [1.54-15.60]). Interaction terms were nonsignificant. CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that ethnicity is an important variable to consider in the relationship between religiosity and mental health. Future studies should attempt to either adjust for or stratify by ethnicity when examining these relationships. SN - 1520-6394 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22786758/Exploring_the_relationship_between_religious_service_attendance_mental_disorders_and_suicidality_among_different_ethnic_groups:_results_from_a_nationally_representative_survey_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/da.21978 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -