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Post-injury repeated administrations of minocycline improve the antinociceptive effect of morphine in chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rat.
Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2012 Oct; 102(4):520-5.PB

Abstract

It is confirmed that pharmacological attenuation of glial cells can alleviate neuropathic pain by lowering proinflammatory cytokine expression. The present study tries to confirm that post-injury administration of glia inhibitor, minocycline, can attenuate the neuropathic pain symptoms and improves the efficacy of morphine anti-nociception in chronic constriction injury (CCI). Male Wistar rats (230-270 g) underwent surgery for induction CCI model of neuropathy. For assessment of the thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after CCI induction, morphine (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 mg/kg; s.c.) and saline were administered on post-operative days (PODs) 0, 6 and 14. Hargreaves and Von-Frey tests were performed before and 30 min after morphine administration, respectively. The results showed significant decrease in antinociceptive effect of morphine on POD 6 compared to POD 0 only at the dose of 5 mg/kg. On the other hand, on POD 14 the antinociceptive effect of morphine (5, 7.5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) significantly decreased in comparison with POD 0. In another set of experiments, animals received minocycline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg; i.p.) for eight days from POD 6 to 13 and then the antinociceptive effect of single dose of morphine 5 mg/kg was tested on POD 14. Behavioral tests showed that minocycline (40 mg/kg) could effectively attenuate the thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on POD 13. Moreover, minocycline (40, 20 mg/kg) improved the anti-hyperalgesic, and minocycline (40 mg/kg) improved the anti-allodynic effects of morphine 5 mg/kg on POD 14. It seems that the reduction of antinociceptive effect of morphine after CCI may be mediated through glia activation. Modulation of glial activity by minocycline can attenuate CCI-induced neuropathic pain. It is also shown that repeated post-injury administration of minocycline improves the antinociceptive effect of morphine in neuropathic pain.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Physiology, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22789876

Citation

Nazemi, Samad, et al. "Post-injury Repeated Administrations of Minocycline Improve the Antinociceptive Effect of Morphine in Chronic Constriction Injury Model of Neuropathic Pain in Rat." Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, vol. 102, no. 4, 2012, pp. 520-5.
Nazemi S, Manaheji H, Zaringhalam J, et al. Post-injury repeated administrations of minocycline improve the antinociceptive effect of morphine in chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2012;102(4):520-5.
Nazemi, S., Manaheji, H., Zaringhalam, J., Sadeghi, M., & Haghparast, A. (2012). Post-injury repeated administrations of minocycline improve the antinociceptive effect of morphine in chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rat. Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior, 102(4), 520-5. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pbb.2012.07.001
Nazemi S, et al. Post-injury Repeated Administrations of Minocycline Improve the Antinociceptive Effect of Morphine in Chronic Constriction Injury Model of Neuropathic Pain in Rat. Pharmacol Biochem Behav. 2012;102(4):520-5. PubMed PMID: 22789876.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Post-injury repeated administrations of minocycline improve the antinociceptive effect of morphine in chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain in rat. AU - Nazemi,Samad, AU - Manaheji,Homa, AU - Zaringhalam,Jalal, AU - Sadeghi,Mehdi, AU - Haghparast,Abbas, Y1 - 2012/07/10/ PY - 2012/02/05/received PY - 2012/06/28/revised PY - 2012/07/01/accepted PY - 2012/7/14/entrez PY - 2012/7/14/pubmed PY - 2013/1/3/medline SP - 520 EP - 5 JF - Pharmacology, biochemistry, and behavior JO - Pharmacol Biochem Behav VL - 102 IS - 4 N2 - It is confirmed that pharmacological attenuation of glial cells can alleviate neuropathic pain by lowering proinflammatory cytokine expression. The present study tries to confirm that post-injury administration of glia inhibitor, minocycline, can attenuate the neuropathic pain symptoms and improves the efficacy of morphine anti-nociception in chronic constriction injury (CCI). Male Wistar rats (230-270 g) underwent surgery for induction CCI model of neuropathy. For assessment of the thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after CCI induction, morphine (2.5, 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 mg/kg; s.c.) and saline were administered on post-operative days (PODs) 0, 6 and 14. Hargreaves and Von-Frey tests were performed before and 30 min after morphine administration, respectively. The results showed significant decrease in antinociceptive effect of morphine on POD 6 compared to POD 0 only at the dose of 5 mg/kg. On the other hand, on POD 14 the antinociceptive effect of morphine (5, 7.5, 10 and 15 mg/kg) significantly decreased in comparison with POD 0. In another set of experiments, animals received minocycline (10, 20 and 40 mg/kg; i.p.) for eight days from POD 6 to 13 and then the antinociceptive effect of single dose of morphine 5 mg/kg was tested on POD 14. Behavioral tests showed that minocycline (40 mg/kg) could effectively attenuate the thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia on POD 13. Moreover, minocycline (40, 20 mg/kg) improved the anti-hyperalgesic, and minocycline (40 mg/kg) improved the anti-allodynic effects of morphine 5 mg/kg on POD 14. It seems that the reduction of antinociceptive effect of morphine after CCI may be mediated through glia activation. Modulation of glial activity by minocycline can attenuate CCI-induced neuropathic pain. It is also shown that repeated post-injury administration of minocycline improves the antinociceptive effect of morphine in neuropathic pain. SN - 1873-5177 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22789876/Post_injury_repeated_administrations_of_minocycline_improve_the_antinociceptive_effect_of_morphine_in_chronic_constriction_injury_model_of_neuropathic_pain_in_rat_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0091-3057(12)00188-8 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -