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Decomposing the components of friendship and friends' influence on adolescent drinking and smoking.
J Adolesc Health. 2012 Aug; 51(2):136-43.JA

Abstract

PURPOSE

Friendship networks are an important source of peer influence. However, existing network studies vary in terms of how they operationalize friendship and friend's influence on adolescent substance use. This study uses social network analysis to characterize three types of friendship relations: (1) mutual or reciprocated, (2) directional, and (3) intimate friends. We then examine the relative effects of each friendship type on adolescent drinking and smoking behavior.

METHODS

Using a saturated sample from the Add Health data, a nationally representative sample of high school adolescents (N = 2,533 nested in 12 schools), we computed the level of exposure to drinking and smoking of friends using a network exposure model, and their association with individual drinking and smoking using fixed effect models.

RESULTS

Results indicated that the influence from mutual or reciprocated type of friendship relations is stronger on adolescent substance use than directional, especially for smoking. Regarding the directionality of directional type of friendship relations, adolescents are equally influenced by both nominating and nominated friends on their drinking and smoking behavior. Results for intimate friends friendship relations indicated that the influence from "best friends" was weaker than the one from non-"best friends," which indicates that the order of friend nomination may not matter as much as nomination reciprocation.

CONCLUSIONS

This study demonstrates that considering different features of friendship relationships is important in evaluating friends' influence on adolescent substance use. Related policy implications are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Health Promotion and Behavioral Sciences, School of Public Health, University of Texas at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. kayo.fujimoto@uth.tmc.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22824443

Citation

Fujimoto, Kayo, and Thomas W. Valente. "Decomposing the Components of Friendship and Friends' Influence On Adolescent Drinking and Smoking." The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, vol. 51, no. 2, 2012, pp. 136-43.
Fujimoto K, Valente TW. Decomposing the components of friendship and friends' influence on adolescent drinking and smoking. J Adolesc Health. 2012;51(2):136-43.
Fujimoto, K., & Valente, T. W. (2012). Decomposing the components of friendship and friends' influence on adolescent drinking and smoking. The Journal of Adolescent Health : Official Publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine, 51(2), 136-43. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2011.11.013
Fujimoto K, Valente TW. Decomposing the Components of Friendship and Friends' Influence On Adolescent Drinking and Smoking. J Adolesc Health. 2012;51(2):136-43. PubMed PMID: 22824443.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Decomposing the components of friendship and friends' influence on adolescent drinking and smoking. AU - Fujimoto,Kayo, AU - Valente,Thomas W, Y1 - 2012/02/10/ PY - 2011/06/07/received PY - 2011/11/11/revised PY - 2011/11/16/accepted PY - 2012/7/25/entrez PY - 2012/7/25/pubmed PY - 2012/10/26/medline SP - 136 EP - 43 JF - The Journal of adolescent health : official publication of the Society for Adolescent Medicine JO - J Adolesc Health VL - 51 IS - 2 N2 - PURPOSE: Friendship networks are an important source of peer influence. However, existing network studies vary in terms of how they operationalize friendship and friend's influence on adolescent substance use. This study uses social network analysis to characterize three types of friendship relations: (1) mutual or reciprocated, (2) directional, and (3) intimate friends. We then examine the relative effects of each friendship type on adolescent drinking and smoking behavior. METHODS: Using a saturated sample from the Add Health data, a nationally representative sample of high school adolescents (N = 2,533 nested in 12 schools), we computed the level of exposure to drinking and smoking of friends using a network exposure model, and their association with individual drinking and smoking using fixed effect models. RESULTS: Results indicated that the influence from mutual or reciprocated type of friendship relations is stronger on adolescent substance use than directional, especially for smoking. Regarding the directionality of directional type of friendship relations, adolescents are equally influenced by both nominating and nominated friends on their drinking and smoking behavior. Results for intimate friends friendship relations indicated that the influence from "best friends" was weaker than the one from non-"best friends," which indicates that the order of friend nomination may not matter as much as nomination reciprocation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that considering different features of friendship relationships is important in evaluating friends' influence on adolescent substance use. Related policy implications are discussed. SN - 1879-1972 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22824443/Decomposing_the_components_of_friendship_and_friends'_influence_on_adolescent_drinking_and_smoking_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1054-139X(11)00646-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -