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Food insecurity and obesogenic maternal infant feeding styles and practices in low-income families.
Pediatrics. 2012 Aug; 130(2):254-61.Ped

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We explored the relationship between household food insecurity and maternal feeding styles, infant feeding practices, and perceptions and attitudes about infant weight in low-income mothers.

METHODS

Mothers participating in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children with infants aged between 2 weeks and 6 months were interviewed. By using regression analyses, the following relationships were examined between food insecurity and: (1) controlling feeding styles (restrictive and pressuring); (2) infant feeding practices, including breastfeeding, juice consumption, and adding cereal to the bottle; and (3) perceptions and attitudes about infant weight. Path analysis was used to determine if perceptions and attitudes about infant weight mediated the relationships between food insecurity and controlling feeding styles.

RESULTS

The sample included 201 mother-infant pairs, with 35% reporting household food insecurity. Food-insecure mothers were more likely to exhibit restrictive (B [SE]: 0.18 [0.08]; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02-0.34) and pressuring (B [SE]: 0.11 [0.06]; 95% CI: 0.001-0.22) feeding styles compared with food-secure mothers. No associations were found with feeding practices. Concern for their infant becoming overweight in the future was associated with food insecurity (adjusted odds ratio: 2.11 [95% CI: 1.02-4.38]). This concern mediated the relationship between food insecurity and both restrictive (P = .009) and pressuring (P = .01) feeding styles.

CONCLUSIONS

Increased concern about future overweight and controlling feeding styles represent potential mechanisms by which food insecurity could be related to obesity. Obesity prevention should aim to decrease food insecurity and to reduce controlling feeding styles in families who remain food insecure.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pediatrics, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, 3444 Kossuth Ave, Bronx, NY 10467, USA. rgross@montefiore.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22826569

Citation

Gross, Rachel S., et al. "Food Insecurity and Obesogenic Maternal Infant Feeding Styles and Practices in Low-income Families." Pediatrics, vol. 130, no. 2, 2012, pp. 254-61.
Gross RS, Mendelsohn AL, Fierman AH, et al. Food insecurity and obesogenic maternal infant feeding styles and practices in low-income families. Pediatrics. 2012;130(2):254-61.
Gross, R. S., Mendelsohn, A. L., Fierman, A. H., Racine, A. D., & Messito, M. J. (2012). Food insecurity and obesogenic maternal infant feeding styles and practices in low-income families. Pediatrics, 130(2), 254-61. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2011-3588
Gross RS, et al. Food Insecurity and Obesogenic Maternal Infant Feeding Styles and Practices in Low-income Families. Pediatrics. 2012;130(2):254-61. PubMed PMID: 22826569.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Food insecurity and obesogenic maternal infant feeding styles and practices in low-income families. AU - Gross,Rachel S, AU - Mendelsohn,Alan L, AU - Fierman,Arthur H, AU - Racine,Andrew D, AU - Messito,Mary Jo, Y1 - 2012/07/23/ PY - 2012/7/25/entrez PY - 2012/7/25/pubmed PY - 2012/10/12/medline SP - 254 EP - 61 JF - Pediatrics JO - Pediatrics VL - 130 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We explored the relationship between household food insecurity and maternal feeding styles, infant feeding practices, and perceptions and attitudes about infant weight in low-income mothers. METHODS: Mothers participating in the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants, and Children with infants aged between 2 weeks and 6 months were interviewed. By using regression analyses, the following relationships were examined between food insecurity and: (1) controlling feeding styles (restrictive and pressuring); (2) infant feeding practices, including breastfeeding, juice consumption, and adding cereal to the bottle; and (3) perceptions and attitudes about infant weight. Path analysis was used to determine if perceptions and attitudes about infant weight mediated the relationships between food insecurity and controlling feeding styles. RESULTS: The sample included 201 mother-infant pairs, with 35% reporting household food insecurity. Food-insecure mothers were more likely to exhibit restrictive (B [SE]: 0.18 [0.08]; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.02-0.34) and pressuring (B [SE]: 0.11 [0.06]; 95% CI: 0.001-0.22) feeding styles compared with food-secure mothers. No associations were found with feeding practices. Concern for their infant becoming overweight in the future was associated with food insecurity (adjusted odds ratio: 2.11 [95% CI: 1.02-4.38]). This concern mediated the relationship between food insecurity and both restrictive (P = .009) and pressuring (P = .01) feeding styles. CONCLUSIONS: Increased concern about future overweight and controlling feeding styles represent potential mechanisms by which food insecurity could be related to obesity. Obesity prevention should aim to decrease food insecurity and to reduce controlling feeding styles in families who remain food insecure. SN - 1098-4275 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22826569/Food_insecurity_and_obesogenic_maternal_infant_feeding_styles_and_practices_in_low_income_families_ L2 - http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22826569 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -