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Exposure to cats and dogs, and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema.
Epidemiology. 2012 Sep; 23(5):742-50.E

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Associations between exposure to cats and dogs and respiratory and allergic outcomes in children have been reported in affluent countries, but little is known about such associations in less-affluent countries.

METHODS

The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, phase 3 was carried out in children aged 6-7 years and adolescents aged 13-14 years across the world. Questions about cats and dogs in the home were included in an additional questionnaire. Using logistic regression, we investigated the association between such exposures and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema. Adjustments were made for sex, region of the world, language, gross national income per capita, and 10 other covariates.

RESULTS

Among children (6-7 years of age), cat exposure in the first year of life was associated with current symptoms of asthma, wheeze, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema, especially in less-affluent countries. Among adolescents (13-14 years of age), we found a positive association between exposure to cats or dogs and symptom prevalence in more-affluent and less-affluent countries. The global multivariate odds ratios for children with complete covariate data were 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 1.08-1.29) for current symptoms of asthma, 1.13 (1.05-1.23) for rhinoconjunctivitis, and 1.38 (1.26-1.52) for eczema. Smaller odds ratios were found for exposure to only dogs. Exposure to only cats was associated with eczema.

CONCLUSION

Early-life exposure to cats is a risk factor for symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in 6- to 7-year-old children, especially in less-affluent countries. Current exposure to cats and dogs combined, and only to dogs, is a risk factor for symptom reporting by 13- to 14-year-old adolescents worldwide.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences and Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Universiteit Utrecht, The Netherlands. b.brunekreef@uu.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22828662

Citation

Brunekreef, Bert, et al. "Exposure to Cats and Dogs, and Symptoms of Asthma, Rhinoconjunctivitis, and Eczema." Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), vol. 23, no. 5, 2012, pp. 742-50.
Brunekreef B, Von Mutius E, Wong G, et al. Exposure to cats and dogs, and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema. Epidemiology. 2012;23(5):742-50.
Brunekreef, B., Von Mutius, E., Wong, G., Odhiambo, J., García-Marcos, L., & Foliaki, S. (2012). Exposure to cats and dogs, and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema. Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.), 23(5), 742-50.
Brunekreef B, et al. Exposure to Cats and Dogs, and Symptoms of Asthma, Rhinoconjunctivitis, and Eczema. Epidemiology. 2012;23(5):742-50. PubMed PMID: 22828662.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Exposure to cats and dogs, and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema. AU - Brunekreef,Bert, AU - Von Mutius,Erika, AU - Wong,Gary, AU - Odhiambo,Joseph, AU - García-Marcos,Luis, AU - Foliaki,Sunia, AU - ,, PY - 2012/7/26/entrez PY - 2012/7/26/pubmed PY - 2012/12/22/medline SP - 742 EP - 50 JF - Epidemiology (Cambridge, Mass.) JO - Epidemiology VL - 23 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Associations between exposure to cats and dogs and respiratory and allergic outcomes in children have been reported in affluent countries, but little is known about such associations in less-affluent countries. METHODS: The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood, phase 3 was carried out in children aged 6-7 years and adolescents aged 13-14 years across the world. Questions about cats and dogs in the home were included in an additional questionnaire. Using logistic regression, we investigated the association between such exposures and symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema. Adjustments were made for sex, region of the world, language, gross national income per capita, and 10 other covariates. RESULTS: Among children (6-7 years of age), cat exposure in the first year of life was associated with current symptoms of asthma, wheeze, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema, especially in less-affluent countries. Among adolescents (13-14 years of age), we found a positive association between exposure to cats or dogs and symptom prevalence in more-affluent and less-affluent countries. The global multivariate odds ratios for children with complete covariate data were 1.17 (95% confidence interval = 1.08-1.29) for current symptoms of asthma, 1.13 (1.05-1.23) for rhinoconjunctivitis, and 1.38 (1.26-1.52) for eczema. Smaller odds ratios were found for exposure to only dogs. Exposure to only cats was associated with eczema. CONCLUSION: Early-life exposure to cats is a risk factor for symptoms of asthma, rhinoconjunctivitis, and eczema in 6- to 7-year-old children, especially in less-affluent countries. Current exposure to cats and dogs combined, and only to dogs, is a risk factor for symptom reporting by 13- to 14-year-old adolescents worldwide. SN - 1531-5487 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22828662/Exposure_to_cats_and_dogs_and_symptoms_of_asthma_rhinoconjunctivitis_and_eczema_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -