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[Health-related quality of life and mental health of children and adolescents in Germany: results from the German HBSC Study 2006-2010].
Gesundheitswesen. 2012 Jul; 74 Suppl:S33-41.G

Abstract

With medical advances, acute -disease in childhood and adolescence could be substantially reduced, thus shifting the focus towards chronic and mental health problems. Currently there is a lack of studies on trends in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mental well-being and their determinants in the context of children's and adolescents' environment (e. g., family, school). The aim of this paper is to describe the trend in HRQoL in children and adolescents from 2006 to 2010 and to analyse factors associated with HRQoL and mental well-being of children and adolescents.Results are based on the German sample (11-, 13- and 15-year-old school children) of the international WHO Study from the 2006 (n=6 896) and 2010 (n=4 723) surveys. HRQoL was assessed by means of KIDSCREEN-10. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a screening instrument for mental health problems, was used as an indicator of mental health. Logistic regressions were performed to analyse the effects of covariates on HRQoL as well as on mental health problems.HRQoL remained fairly stable between 2006 and 2010 for both boys and girls. Approximately 85% of the school children report a high or normal HRQoL, whereby girls indicate a lower HRQoL than boys. Overall, 14,3% of the pupils show signs of mental health problems. The model results show that poor communication with parents, spending little time with friends, lack of perceived support from classmates and a negative attitude towards school are negatively associated with mental health.The majority of children and adolescents report a high HRQoL over time. The fact that every 7th 11- to 15-year-old shows signs of mental health problems raises concern and suggests that addressing mental health problems needs to gain more priority in public health measures.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Forschungssektion Child Public Health, Universitätsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Martinistrasse 52, Hamburg. ravens-sieberer@uke.deNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

ger

PubMed ID

22836889

Citation

Ravens-Sieberer, U, et al. "[Health-related Quality of Life and Mental Health of Children and Adolescents in Germany: Results From the German HBSC Study 2006-2010]." Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Arzte Des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)), vol. 74 Suppl, 2012, pp. S33-41.
Ravens-Sieberer U, Ottova V, Hillebrandt D, et al. [Health-related quality of life and mental health of children and adolescents in Germany: results from the German HBSC Study 2006-2010]. Gesundheitswesen. 2012;74 Suppl:S33-41.
Ravens-Sieberer, U., Ottova, V., Hillebrandt, D., & Klasen, F. (2012). [Health-related quality of life and mental health of children and adolescents in Germany: results from the German HBSC Study 2006-2010]. Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband Der Arzte Des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)), 74 Suppl, S33-41. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0032-1312641
Ravens-Sieberer U, et al. [Health-related Quality of Life and Mental Health of Children and Adolescents in Germany: Results From the German HBSC Study 2006-2010]. Gesundheitswesen. 2012;74 Suppl:S33-41. PubMed PMID: 22836889.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Health-related quality of life and mental health of children and adolescents in Germany: results from the German HBSC Study 2006-2010]. AU - Ravens-Sieberer,U, AU - Ottova,V, AU - Hillebrandt,D, AU - Klasen,F, AU - ,, Y1 - 2012/07/26/ PY - 2012/7/28/entrez PY - 2012/8/8/pubmed PY - 2013/1/9/medline SP - S33 EP - 41 JF - Gesundheitswesen (Bundesverband der Arzte des Offentlichen Gesundheitsdienstes (Germany)) JO - Gesundheitswesen VL - 74 Suppl N2 - With medical advances, acute -disease in childhood and adolescence could be substantially reduced, thus shifting the focus towards chronic and mental health problems. Currently there is a lack of studies on trends in health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and mental well-being and their determinants in the context of children's and adolescents' environment (e. g., family, school). The aim of this paper is to describe the trend in HRQoL in children and adolescents from 2006 to 2010 and to analyse factors associated with HRQoL and mental well-being of children and adolescents.Results are based on the German sample (11-, 13- and 15-year-old school children) of the international WHO Study from the 2006 (n=6 896) and 2010 (n=4 723) surveys. HRQoL was assessed by means of KIDSCREEN-10. The Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), a screening instrument for mental health problems, was used as an indicator of mental health. Logistic regressions were performed to analyse the effects of covariates on HRQoL as well as on mental health problems.HRQoL remained fairly stable between 2006 and 2010 for both boys and girls. Approximately 85% of the school children report a high or normal HRQoL, whereby girls indicate a lower HRQoL than boys. Overall, 14,3% of the pupils show signs of mental health problems. The model results show that poor communication with parents, spending little time with friends, lack of perceived support from classmates and a negative attitude towards school are negatively associated with mental health.The majority of children and adolescents report a high HRQoL over time. The fact that every 7th 11- to 15-year-old shows signs of mental health problems raises concern and suggests that addressing mental health problems needs to gain more priority in public health measures. SN - 1439-4421 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22836889/[Health_related_quality_of_life_and_mental_health_of_children_and_adolescents_in_Germany:_results_from_the_German_HBSC_Study_2006_2010]_ L2 - http://www.thieme-connect.com/DOI/DOI?10.1055/s-0032-1312641 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -