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Outbreak of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella oxytoca infections associated with contaminated handwashing sinks(1).
Emerg Infect Dis 2012; 18(8):1242-7EI

Abstract

Klebsiella oxytoca is primarily a health care-associated pathogen acquired from environmental sources. During October 2006-March 2011, a total of 66 patients in a hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, acquired class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. oxytoca with 1 of 2 related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. New cases continued to occur despite reinforcement of infection control practices, prevalence screening, and contact precautions for colonized/infected patients. Cultures from handwashing sinks in the intensive care unit yielded K. oxytoca with identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns to cultures from the clinical cases. No infections occurred after implementation of sink cleaning 3×/day, sink drain modifications, and an antimicrobial stewardship program. In contrast, a cluster of 4 patients infected with K. oxytoca in a geographically distant medical ward without contaminated sinks was contained with implementation of active screening and contact precautions. Sinks should be considered potential reservoirs for clusters of infection caused by K. oxytoca.

Authors+Show Affiliations

University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22841005

Citation

Lowe, Christopher, et al. "Outbreak of Extended-spectrum Β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella Oxytoca Infections Associated With Contaminated Handwashing Sinks(1)." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 18, no. 8, 2012, pp. 1242-7.
Lowe C, Willey B, O'Shaughnessy A, et al. Outbreak of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella oxytoca infections associated with contaminated handwashing sinks(1). Emerging Infect Dis. 2012;18(8):1242-7.
Lowe, C., Willey, B., O'Shaughnessy, A., Lee, W., Lum, M., Pike, K., ... McGeer, A. (2012). Outbreak of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella oxytoca infections associated with contaminated handwashing sinks(1). Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(8), pp. 1242-7. doi:10.3201/eid1808.111268.
Lowe C, et al. Outbreak of Extended-spectrum Β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella Oxytoca Infections Associated With Contaminated Handwashing Sinks(1). Emerging Infect Dis. 2012;18(8):1242-7. PubMed PMID: 22841005.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outbreak of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Klebsiella oxytoca infections associated with contaminated handwashing sinks(1). AU - Lowe,Christopher, AU - Willey,Barbara, AU - O'Shaughnessy,Anna, AU - Lee,Wayne, AU - Lum,Ming, AU - Pike,Karen, AU - Larocque,Cindy, AU - Dedier,Helen, AU - Dales,Lorraine, AU - Moore,Christine, AU - McGeer,Allison, AU - ,, PY - 2012/7/31/entrez PY - 2012/7/31/pubmed PY - 2013/1/15/medline SP - 1242 EP - 7 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerging Infect. Dis. VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - Klebsiella oxytoca is primarily a health care-associated pathogen acquired from environmental sources. During October 2006-March 2011, a total of 66 patients in a hospital in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, acquired class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. oxytoca with 1 of 2 related pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns. New cases continued to occur despite reinforcement of infection control practices, prevalence screening, and contact precautions for colonized/infected patients. Cultures from handwashing sinks in the intensive care unit yielded K. oxytoca with identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns to cultures from the clinical cases. No infections occurred after implementation of sink cleaning 3×/day, sink drain modifications, and an antimicrobial stewardship program. In contrast, a cluster of 4 patients infected with K. oxytoca in a geographically distant medical ward without contaminated sinks was contained with implementation of active screening and contact precautions. Sinks should be considered potential reservoirs for clusters of infection caused by K. oxytoca. SN - 1080-6059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22841005/Outbreak_of_extended_spectrum_β_lactamase_producing_Klebsiella_oxytoca_infections_associated_with_contaminated_handwashing_sinks_1__ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1808.111268 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -