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Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth in a cohort of pregnant women.
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Oct; 69(10):736-44.OE

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

Scant evidence is available on effects of air pollution on longitudinally measured fetal biometry, and thus it remains unclear as to whether there are critical windows of exposure or specificity of effects. Our objective was to examine the association between exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during pregnancy and fetal and neonatal anthropometry in a cohort of Spanish women.

METHODS

Temporally adjusted land-use regression was used to estimate exposure to NO2 at home addresses. Biparietal diameter (BPD), abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL) and estimated fetal weight (EFW) were evaluated in each trimester by ultrasound. As neonatal outcomes, weight, length and head circumference were analysed. SD scores adjusted by gestational age, mother characteristics and fetus sex were calculated at 12, 20 and 32 weeks of gestation as well as at birth. The association between fetal growth and average exposure to NO2 in the relevant windows was investigated using regression models, adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle-related variables.

RESULTS

Exposure to NO2 was inversely associated with BPD, AC and EFW at week 32 and with growth in these parameters in weeks 20-32. BPD and FL were also affected earlier, at week 20. NO2 levels above the median (38 μg/m3) reduced size at week 32 by around 9% in all parameters except for FL (6%). The critical windows of exposure were in early pregnancy, before 20 weeks. Exposure in this period was also inversely associated with neonatal length and head circumference.

CONCLUSIONS

Maternal exposure to NO2 is associated with impaired fetal growth from mid-gestation onwards.

Authors+Show Affiliations

High Center for Public Health Research-CSISP, Avda, Cataluña no 21, Valencia 46020, Spain. inyiguez_car@gva.esNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22843441

Citation

Iñiguez, Carmen, et al. "Prenatal Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution and Fetal Growth in a Cohort of Pregnant Women." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 69, no. 10, 2012, pp. 736-44.
Iñiguez C, Ballester F, Estarlich M, et al. Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth in a cohort of pregnant women. Occup Environ Med. 2012;69(10):736-44.
Iñiguez, C., Ballester, F., Estarlich, M., Esplugues, A., Murcia, M., Llop, S., Plana, A., Amorós, R., & Rebagliato, M. (2012). Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth in a cohort of pregnant women. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 69(10), 736-44. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2011-100550
Iñiguez C, et al. Prenatal Exposure to Traffic-related Air Pollution and Fetal Growth in a Cohort of Pregnant Women. Occup Environ Med. 2012;69(10):736-44. PubMed PMID: 22843441.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Prenatal exposure to traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth in a cohort of pregnant women. AU - Iñiguez,Carmen, AU - Ballester,Ferran, AU - Estarlich,Marisa, AU - Esplugues,Ana, AU - Murcia,Mario, AU - Llop,Sabrina, AU - Plana,Alfredo, AU - Amorós,Rubén, AU - Rebagliato,Marisa, Y1 - 2012/07/27/ PY - 2012/7/31/entrez PY - 2012/7/31/pubmed PY - 2012/11/13/medline SP - 736 EP - 44 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 69 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: Scant evidence is available on effects of air pollution on longitudinally measured fetal biometry, and thus it remains unclear as to whether there are critical windows of exposure or specificity of effects. Our objective was to examine the association between exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) during pregnancy and fetal and neonatal anthropometry in a cohort of Spanish women. METHODS: Temporally adjusted land-use regression was used to estimate exposure to NO2 at home addresses. Biparietal diameter (BPD), abdominal circumference (AC), femur length (FL) and estimated fetal weight (EFW) were evaluated in each trimester by ultrasound. As neonatal outcomes, weight, length and head circumference were analysed. SD scores adjusted by gestational age, mother characteristics and fetus sex were calculated at 12, 20 and 32 weeks of gestation as well as at birth. The association between fetal growth and average exposure to NO2 in the relevant windows was investigated using regression models, adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle-related variables. RESULTS: Exposure to NO2 was inversely associated with BPD, AC and EFW at week 32 and with growth in these parameters in weeks 20-32. BPD and FL were also affected earlier, at week 20. NO2 levels above the median (38 μg/m3) reduced size at week 32 by around 9% in all parameters except for FL (6%). The critical windows of exposure were in early pregnancy, before 20 weeks. Exposure in this period was also inversely associated with neonatal length and head circumference. CONCLUSIONS: Maternal exposure to NO2 is associated with impaired fetal growth from mid-gestation onwards. SN - 1470-7926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22843441/Prenatal_exposure_to_traffic_related_air_pollution_and_fetal_growth_in_a_cohort_of_pregnant_women_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22843441 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -