Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sexual attraction, sexual identity, and psychosocial wellbeing in a national sample of young women during emerging adulthood.
J Youth Adolesc. 2013 Jan; 42(1):82-95.JY

Abstract

Identity-based conceptualizations of sexual orientation may not account adequately for variation in young women's sexuality. Sexual minorities fare worse in psychosocial markers of wellbeing (i.e., depressive symptoms, anxiety, self esteem, social support) than heterosexual youth; however, it remains unclear whether these health disparities exclusively affect individuals who adopt a sexual minority identity or if they also may be present among heterosexually-identified youth who report same-sex attractions. We examined the relationship between sexual attraction, sexual identity, and psychosocial wellbeing in the female only subsample (weighted, n = 391) of a national sample of emerging adults (age 18-24). Women in this study rated on a scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (extremely) their degree of sexual attraction to males and females, respectively. From these scores, women were divided into 4 groups (low female/low male attraction, low female/high male attraction, high female/low male attraction, or high female/high male attraction). We explored the relationship between experiences of attraction, reported sexual identity, and psychosocial outcomes using ordinary least squares regression. The results indicated sexual attraction to be predictive of women's psychosocial wellbeing as much as or more than sexual identity measures. We discuss these findings in terms of the diversity found in young women's sexuality, and how sexual minority status may be experienced by this group.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Health Behavior and Health Education, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2029, USA. johnsmm@umich.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22847750

Citation

Johns, Michelle Marie, et al. "Sexual Attraction, Sexual Identity, and Psychosocial Wellbeing in a National Sample of Young Women During Emerging Adulthood." Journal of Youth and Adolescence, vol. 42, no. 1, 2013, pp. 82-95.
Johns MM, Zimmerman M, Bauermeister JA. Sexual attraction, sexual identity, and psychosocial wellbeing in a national sample of young women during emerging adulthood. J Youth Adolesc. 2013;42(1):82-95.
Johns, M. M., Zimmerman, M., & Bauermeister, J. A. (2013). Sexual attraction, sexual identity, and psychosocial wellbeing in a national sample of young women during emerging adulthood. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42(1), 82-95. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-012-9795-2
Johns MM, Zimmerman M, Bauermeister JA. Sexual Attraction, Sexual Identity, and Psychosocial Wellbeing in a National Sample of Young Women During Emerging Adulthood. J Youth Adolesc. 2013;42(1):82-95. PubMed PMID: 22847750.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sexual attraction, sexual identity, and psychosocial wellbeing in a national sample of young women during emerging adulthood. AU - Johns,Michelle Marie, AU - Zimmerman,Marc, AU - Bauermeister,Jose A, Y1 - 2012/07/31/ PY - 2012/04/20/received PY - 2012/07/12/accepted PY - 2012/8/1/entrez PY - 2012/8/1/pubmed PY - 2013/6/12/medline SP - 82 EP - 95 JF - Journal of youth and adolescence JO - J Youth Adolesc VL - 42 IS - 1 N2 - Identity-based conceptualizations of sexual orientation may not account adequately for variation in young women's sexuality. Sexual minorities fare worse in psychosocial markers of wellbeing (i.e., depressive symptoms, anxiety, self esteem, social support) than heterosexual youth; however, it remains unclear whether these health disparities exclusively affect individuals who adopt a sexual minority identity or if they also may be present among heterosexually-identified youth who report same-sex attractions. We examined the relationship between sexual attraction, sexual identity, and psychosocial wellbeing in the female only subsample (weighted, n = 391) of a national sample of emerging adults (age 18-24). Women in this study rated on a scale from 1 (not at all) to 5 (extremely) their degree of sexual attraction to males and females, respectively. From these scores, women were divided into 4 groups (low female/low male attraction, low female/high male attraction, high female/low male attraction, or high female/high male attraction). We explored the relationship between experiences of attraction, reported sexual identity, and psychosocial outcomes using ordinary least squares regression. The results indicated sexual attraction to be predictive of women's psychosocial wellbeing as much as or more than sexual identity measures. We discuss these findings in terms of the diversity found in young women's sexuality, and how sexual minority status may be experienced by this group. SN - 1573-6601 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22847750/Sexual_attraction_sexual_identity_and_psychosocial_wellbeing_in_a_national_sample_of_young_women_during_emerging_adulthood_ L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10964-012-9795-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -