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Locally derived traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth restriction: a retrospective cohort study.
Occup Environ Med. 2012 Nov; 69(11):815-22.OE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Fetal growth restriction has been inconsistently associated with maternal exposure to elevated levels of traffic-related air pollution.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the relationship between an individualised measure of fetal growth and maternal exposure to a specific marker for traffic-related air pollution.

METHODS

We estimated maternal residential exposure to a marker for traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxide, NO2) during pregnancy for 23,452 births using temporally adjusted land-use regression. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations with small for gestational age and sex (SGA) and fetal growth restriction, defined as proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW) below the 10th percentile. Sub-populations investigated were: women who spent most time at home, women who did not move house, women with respiratory or circulatory morbidity, women living in low/middle/high socio-economic areas, women who delivered before 37 weeks gestation, and women who delivered from 37 weeks gestation.

RESULTS

An IQR increase in traffic-related air pollution in the second trimester across all women was associated with an OR of 1.31 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.60) for fetal growth restriction. Effects on fetal growth restriction (low POBW) were highest among women who subsequently delivered before 37 weeks of gestation. Effects on SGA were highest among women who did not move house: OR 1.35 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.69).

CONCLUSIONS

Larger effect sizes were observed for low POBW than for SGA. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution in mid to late pregnancy was associated with risk of SGA and low POBW in this study.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Subiaco, Western Australia, Australia. pereirag@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22851740

Citation

Pereira, Gavin, et al. "Locally Derived Traffic-related Air Pollution and Fetal Growth Restriction: a Retrospective Cohort Study." Occupational and Environmental Medicine, vol. 69, no. 11, 2012, pp. 815-22.
Pereira G, Cook AG, Haggar F, et al. Locally derived traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth restriction: a retrospective cohort study. Occup Environ Med. 2012;69(11):815-22.
Pereira, G., Cook, A. G., Haggar, F., Bower, C., & Nassar, N. (2012). Locally derived traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth restriction: a retrospective cohort study. Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 69(11), 815-22. https://doi.org/10.1136/oemed-2011-100509
Pereira G, et al. Locally Derived Traffic-related Air Pollution and Fetal Growth Restriction: a Retrospective Cohort Study. Occup Environ Med. 2012;69(11):815-22. PubMed PMID: 22851740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Locally derived traffic-related air pollution and fetal growth restriction: a retrospective cohort study. AU - Pereira,Gavin, AU - Cook,Angus G, AU - Haggar,Fatima, AU - Bower,Carol, AU - Nassar,Natasha, Y1 - 2012/07/31/ PY - 2012/8/2/entrez PY - 2012/8/2/pubmed PY - 2012/12/18/medline SP - 815 EP - 22 JF - Occupational and environmental medicine JO - Occup Environ Med VL - 69 IS - 11 N2 - BACKGROUND: Fetal growth restriction has been inconsistently associated with maternal exposure to elevated levels of traffic-related air pollution. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the relationship between an individualised measure of fetal growth and maternal exposure to a specific marker for traffic-related air pollution. METHODS: We estimated maternal residential exposure to a marker for traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxide, NO2) during pregnancy for 23,452 births using temporally adjusted land-use regression. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations with small for gestational age and sex (SGA) and fetal growth restriction, defined as proportion of optimal birth weight (POBW) below the 10th percentile. Sub-populations investigated were: women who spent most time at home, women who did not move house, women with respiratory or circulatory morbidity, women living in low/middle/high socio-economic areas, women who delivered before 37 weeks gestation, and women who delivered from 37 weeks gestation. RESULTS: An IQR increase in traffic-related air pollution in the second trimester across all women was associated with an OR of 1.31 (95% CI 1.07 to 1.60) for fetal growth restriction. Effects on fetal growth restriction (low POBW) were highest among women who subsequently delivered before 37 weeks of gestation. Effects on SGA were highest among women who did not move house: OR 1.35 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.69). CONCLUSIONS: Larger effect sizes were observed for low POBW than for SGA. Exposure to traffic-related air pollution in mid to late pregnancy was associated with risk of SGA and low POBW in this study. SN - 1470-7926 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22851740/Locally_derived_traffic_related_air_pollution_and_fetal_growth_restriction:_a_retrospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://oem.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22851740 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -