Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses to sucrose consumed with blackcurrants and lingonberries in healthy women.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Sucrose induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. In vitro studies suggest that berries may reduce the digestion and absorption of sucrose and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited.

OBJECTIVE

We investigated the effects of sucrose ingested with blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum) and lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) on postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses.

DESIGN

Twenty healthy women participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover meal study. They consumed whole blackcurrants or lingonberries (150 g served as purées) or blackcurrant or lingonberry nectars (300 mL), each with 35 g added sucrose. Sucrose alone (35 g in 300 mL water) was used as a reference. Blood samples were collected at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min.

RESULTS

In comparison with sucrose alone, ingestion of sucrose with whole berries resulted in reduced glucose and insulin concentrations during the first 30 min and a slower decline during the second hour and a significantly improved glycemic profile. Berries prevented the sucrose-induced late postprandial hypoglycemic response and the compensatory free fatty acid rebound. Nearly similar effects were observed when sucrose was consumed with berry nectars. The improved responses were evident despite the higher content of available carbohydrate in the berry and nectar meals, because of the natural sugars present in berries.

CONCLUSIONS

Blackcurrants and lingonberries, as either whole berries or nectars, optimize the postprandial metabolic responses to sucrose. The responses are consistent with delayed digestion of sucrose and consequent slower absorption of glucose.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland. riitta.torronen@uef.fi

    , , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Beverages
    Blood Glucose
    Cross-Over Studies
    Dietary Sucrose
    Fatty Acids, Nonesterified
    Female
    Finland
    Fruit
    Humans
    Hyperglycemia
    Hyperinsulinism
    Hypoglycemia
    Insulin
    Middle Aged
    Postprandial Period
    Ribes
    Single-Blind Method
    Vaccinium vitis-idaea

    Pub Type(s)

    Clinical Trial
    Comparative Study
    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22854401

    Citation

    Törrönen, Riitta, et al. "Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, and Free Fatty Acid Responses to Sucrose Consumed With Blackcurrants and Lingonberries in Healthy Women." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 96, no. 3, 2012, pp. 527-33.
    Törrönen R, Kolehmainen M, Sarkkinen E, et al. Postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses to sucrose consumed with blackcurrants and lingonberries in healthy women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(3):527-33.
    Törrönen, R., Kolehmainen, M., Sarkkinen, E., Mykkänen, H., & Niskanen, L. (2012). Postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses to sucrose consumed with blackcurrants and lingonberries in healthy women. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 96(3), pp. 527-33. doi:10.3945/ajcn.112.042184.
    Törrönen R, et al. Postprandial Glucose, Insulin, and Free Fatty Acid Responses to Sucrose Consumed With Blackcurrants and Lingonberries in Healthy Women. Am J Clin Nutr. 2012;96(3):527-33. PubMed PMID: 22854401.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses to sucrose consumed with blackcurrants and lingonberries in healthy women. AU - Törrönen,Riitta, AU - Kolehmainen,Marjukka, AU - Sarkkinen,Essi, AU - Mykkänen,Hannu, AU - Niskanen,Leo, Y1 - 2012/08/01/ PY - 2012/8/3/entrez PY - 2012/8/3/pubmed PY - 2012/10/27/medline SP - 527 EP - 33 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 96 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Sucrose induces high postprandial glucose and insulin responses. In vitro studies suggest that berries may reduce the digestion and absorption of sucrose and thereby suppress postprandial glycemia, but the evidence in humans is limited. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the effects of sucrose ingested with blackcurrants (Ribes nigrum) and lingonberries (Vaccinium vitis-idaea) on postprandial glucose, insulin, and free fatty acid responses. DESIGN: Twenty healthy women participated in a randomized, controlled, crossover meal study. They consumed whole blackcurrants or lingonberries (150 g served as purées) or blackcurrant or lingonberry nectars (300 mL), each with 35 g added sucrose. Sucrose alone (35 g in 300 mL water) was used as a reference. Blood samples were collected at 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 min. RESULTS: In comparison with sucrose alone, ingestion of sucrose with whole berries resulted in reduced glucose and insulin concentrations during the first 30 min and a slower decline during the second hour and a significantly improved glycemic profile. Berries prevented the sucrose-induced late postprandial hypoglycemic response and the compensatory free fatty acid rebound. Nearly similar effects were observed when sucrose was consumed with berry nectars. The improved responses were evident despite the higher content of available carbohydrate in the berry and nectar meals, because of the natural sugars present in berries. CONCLUSIONS: Blackcurrants and lingonberries, as either whole berries or nectars, optimize the postprandial metabolic responses to sucrose. The responses are consistent with delayed digestion of sucrose and consequent slower absorption of glucose. SN - 1938-3207 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22854401/Postprandial_glucose_insulin_and_free_fatty_acid_responses_to_sucrose_consumed_with_blackcurrants_and_lingonberries_in_healthy_women_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.3945/ajcn.112.042184 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -