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Meat consumption and risk of lung cancer: evidence from observational studies.
Ann Oncol 2012; 23(12):3163-70AO

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A number of epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent findings on the association between meat consumption and lung cancer.

DESIGN

We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between meat consumption and lung cancer risk in epidemiological studies.

RESULTS

Twenty-three case-control and 11 cohort studies were included. All studies adjusted for smoking or conducted in never smokers. The summary relative risks (RRs) of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest intake categories were 1.35 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.69) for total meat, 1.34 (95% CI 1.18-1.52) for red meat, and 1.06 (95% CI 0.90-1.25) for processed meat. An inverse association was found between poultry intake and lung cancer (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.97), but not for total white meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.82-1.37) or fish (RR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.96-1.07).

CONCLUSIONS

The relationship between meat intake and lung cancer risk appears to depend on the types of meat consumed. A high intake of red meat may increase the risk of lung cancer by about 35%, while a high intake of poultry decreases the risk by about 10%. More well-designed cohort studies on meat mutagens or heme iron, meat cooking preferences, and doneness level are needed to fully characterize this meat-lung cancer association.

Authors+Show Affiliations

State Key Laboratory of Oncogene and Related Genes, Shanghai Cancer Institute, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22855553

Citation

Yang, W S., et al. "Meat Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer: Evidence From Observational Studies." Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, vol. 23, no. 12, 2012, pp. 3163-70.
Yang WS, Wong MY, Vogtmann E, et al. Meat consumption and risk of lung cancer: evidence from observational studies. Ann Oncol. 2012;23(12):3163-70.
Yang, W. S., Wong, M. Y., Vogtmann, E., Tang, R. Q., Xie, L., Yang, Y. S., ... Xiang, Y. B. (2012). Meat consumption and risk of lung cancer: evidence from observational studies. Annals of Oncology : Official Journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology, 23(12), pp. 3163-70. doi:10.1093/annonc/mds207.
Yang WS, et al. Meat Consumption and Risk of Lung Cancer: Evidence From Observational Studies. Ann Oncol. 2012;23(12):3163-70. PubMed PMID: 22855553.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Meat consumption and risk of lung cancer: evidence from observational studies. AU - Yang,W S, AU - Wong,M Y, AU - Vogtmann,E, AU - Tang,R Q, AU - Xie,L, AU - Yang,Y S, AU - Wu,Q J, AU - Zhang,W, AU - Xiang,Y B, Y1 - 2012/07/31/ PY - 2012/8/3/entrez PY - 2012/8/3/pubmed PY - 2013/6/20/medline SP - 3163 EP - 70 JF - Annals of oncology : official journal of the European Society for Medical Oncology JO - Ann. Oncol. VL - 23 IS - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: A number of epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent findings on the association between meat consumption and lung cancer. DESIGN: We therefore conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the relationship between meat consumption and lung cancer risk in epidemiological studies. RESULTS: Twenty-three case-control and 11 cohort studies were included. All studies adjusted for smoking or conducted in never smokers. The summary relative risks (RRs) of lung cancer for the highest versus lowest intake categories were 1.35 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08-1.69) for total meat, 1.34 (95% CI 1.18-1.52) for red meat, and 1.06 (95% CI 0.90-1.25) for processed meat. An inverse association was found between poultry intake and lung cancer (RR = 0.91, 95% CI 0.85-0.97), but not for total white meat (RR = 1.06, 95% CI 0.82-1.37) or fish (RR = 1.01, 95% CI 0.96-1.07). CONCLUSIONS: The relationship between meat intake and lung cancer risk appears to depend on the types of meat consumed. A high intake of red meat may increase the risk of lung cancer by about 35%, while a high intake of poultry decreases the risk by about 10%. More well-designed cohort studies on meat mutagens or heme iron, meat cooking preferences, and doneness level are needed to fully characterize this meat-lung cancer association. SN - 1569-8041 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22855553/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/annonc/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/annonc/mds207 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -