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Association of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake with the risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies.

Abstract

Results from observational studies on the association of fish and n-3 fatty acid consumption with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk are conflicting. Hence, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate this association from cohort studies. A comprehensive search was then conducted to identify cohort studies on the association of fish and/or n-3 fatty acid intake with T2DM risk. In the highest v. lowest categorical analyses, the fixed or random-effect model was selected based on the homogeneity test among studies. Linear and non-linear dose-response relationships were also assessed by univariate and bivariate random-effect meta-regression with restricted maximum likelihood estimation. In the highest v. lowest categorical analyses, the pooled relative risk (RR) of T2DM for intake of fish and n-3 fatty acid was 1·146 (95 % CI 0·975, 1·346) and 1·076 (95 % CI 0·955, 1·213), respectively. In the linear dose-response relationship, the pooled RR for an increment of one time (about 105 g)/week of fish intake (four times/month) and of 0·1 g/d of n-3 fatty acid intake was 1·042 (95 % CI 1·026, 1·058) and 1·057 (95 % CI 1·042, 1·073), respectively. The significant non-linear dose-response associations of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake with T2DM risk were not observed. The present evidence from observational studies suggests that the intake of both fish and n-3 fatty acids might be weakly positively associated with the T2DM risk. Further studies are needed to confirm these results.

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  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Shandong University, Jinan 250012, Shandong, People's Republic of China.

    ,

    Source

    The British journal of nutrition 108:3 2012 Aug pg 408-17

    MeSH

    Animals
    Cohort Studies
    Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2
    Diet
    Fatty Acids, Omega-3
    Fishes
    Food Analysis
    Humans
    Meat

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Meta-Analysis
    Review

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22857650

    Citation

    Zhou, Yunping, et al. "Association of Fish and N-3 Fatty Acid Intake With the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 108, no. 3, 2012, pp. 408-17.
    Zhou Y, Tian C, Jia C. Association of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake with the risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. Br J Nutr. 2012;108(3):408-17.
    Zhou, Y., Tian, C., & Jia, C. (2012). Association of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake with the risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. The British Journal of Nutrition, 108(3), pp. 408-17. doi:10.1017/S0007114512002036.
    Zhou Y, Tian C, Jia C. Association of Fish and N-3 Fatty Acid Intake With the Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. Br J Nutr. 2012;108(3):408-17. PubMed PMID: 22857650.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Association of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake with the risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Zhou,Yunping, AU - Tian,Changwei, AU - Jia,Chongqi, PY - 2012/8/4/entrez PY - 2012/8/4/pubmed PY - 2012/10/26/medline SP - 408 EP - 17 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 108 IS - 3 N2 - Results from observational studies on the association of fish and n-3 fatty acid consumption with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) risk are conflicting. Hence, a meta-analysis was performed to investigate this association from cohort studies. A comprehensive search was then conducted to identify cohort studies on the association of fish and/or n-3 fatty acid intake with T2DM risk. In the highest v. lowest categorical analyses, the fixed or random-effect model was selected based on the homogeneity test among studies. Linear and non-linear dose-response relationships were also assessed by univariate and bivariate random-effect meta-regression with restricted maximum likelihood estimation. In the highest v. lowest categorical analyses, the pooled relative risk (RR) of T2DM for intake of fish and n-3 fatty acid was 1·146 (95 % CI 0·975, 1·346) and 1·076 (95 % CI 0·955, 1·213), respectively. In the linear dose-response relationship, the pooled RR for an increment of one time (about 105 g)/week of fish intake (four times/month) and of 0·1 g/d of n-3 fatty acid intake was 1·042 (95 % CI 1·026, 1·058) and 1·057 (95 % CI 1·042, 1·073), respectively. The significant non-linear dose-response associations of fish and n-3 fatty acid intake with T2DM risk were not observed. The present evidence from observational studies suggests that the intake of both fish and n-3 fatty acids might be weakly positively associated with the T2DM risk. Further studies are needed to confirm these results. SN - 1475-2662 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22857650/Association_of_fish_and_n_3_fatty_acid_intake_with_the_risk_of_type_2_diabetes:_a_meta_analysis_of_prospective_studies_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114512002036/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -