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Back pain amongst mid-age Australian women: a longitudinal analysis of provider use and self-prescribed treatments.
Complement Ther Med. 2012 Oct; 20(5):275-82.CT

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

To analyse use of conventional and complementary and alternative (CAM) practitioners and self-prescribed CAM amongst mid-age Australian women with back pain.

DESIGN

Self-completion postal surveys completed in 2004 and 2007, of the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's health. Questions asked for written responses about the use of conventional practitioners, CAM practitioners and self-prescribed CAM for treatment of back pain.

SETTING

Analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal survey data (n=9820), conducted as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), which was designed to investigate multiple factors affecting the health and well being of women over a 20-year period.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE

Women were asked if they had sought help for back pain in the previous twelve months.

RESULTS

The prevalence of back pain was 54.8% (n=5383). The percentage of women who sought help for their back pain was 17.3% (n=1700). Of the women who sought help for back pain, 2% consulted with a CAM practitioner only, 35% consulted a conventional practitioner only and 63% with both a conventional and CAM practitioner.

CONCLUSIONS

Back pain is prevalent amongst mid-age Australian women, although only one third sought help. Women who sought help for their back pack were high users of CAM (practitioners and self-prescribed) and conventional care providers, consulting a CAM practitioner in complement with conventional biomedical consultations rather than as an alternative. Further research is needed to explore the complex contemporary landscapes of back pain negotiation and management.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22863641

Citation

Broom, Alex F., et al. "Back Pain Amongst Mid-age Australian Women: a Longitudinal Analysis of Provider Use and Self-prescribed Treatments." Complementary Therapies in Medicine, vol. 20, no. 5, 2012, pp. 275-82.
Broom AF, Kirby ER, Sibbritt DW, et al. Back pain amongst mid-age Australian women: a longitudinal analysis of provider use and self-prescribed treatments. Complement Ther Med. 2012;20(5):275-82.
Broom, A. F., Kirby, E. R., Sibbritt, D. W., Adams, J., & Refshauge, K. M. (2012). Back pain amongst mid-age Australian women: a longitudinal analysis of provider use and self-prescribed treatments. Complementary Therapies in Medicine, 20(5), 275-82. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2012.05.003
Broom AF, et al. Back Pain Amongst Mid-age Australian Women: a Longitudinal Analysis of Provider Use and Self-prescribed Treatments. Complement Ther Med. 2012;20(5):275-82. PubMed PMID: 22863641.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Back pain amongst mid-age Australian women: a longitudinal analysis of provider use and self-prescribed treatments. AU - Broom,Alex F, AU - Kirby,Emma R, AU - Sibbritt,David W, AU - Adams,Jon, AU - Refshauge,Kathryn M, Y1 - 2012/06/02/ PY - 2011/12/20/received PY - 2012/04/19/revised PY - 2012/05/09/accepted PY - 2012/8/7/entrez PY - 2012/8/7/pubmed PY - 2012/12/18/medline SP - 275 EP - 82 JF - Complementary therapies in medicine JO - Complement Ther Med VL - 20 IS - 5 N2 - OBJECTIVES: To analyse use of conventional and complementary and alternative (CAM) practitioners and self-prescribed CAM amongst mid-age Australian women with back pain. DESIGN: Self-completion postal surveys completed in 2004 and 2007, of the mid-age cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's health. Questions asked for written responses about the use of conventional practitioners, CAM practitioners and self-prescribed CAM for treatment of back pain. SETTING: Analysis of cross-sectional and longitudinal survey data (n=9820), conducted as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health (ALSWH), which was designed to investigate multiple factors affecting the health and well being of women over a 20-year period. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Women were asked if they had sought help for back pain in the previous twelve months. RESULTS: The prevalence of back pain was 54.8% (n=5383). The percentage of women who sought help for their back pain was 17.3% (n=1700). Of the women who sought help for back pain, 2% consulted with a CAM practitioner only, 35% consulted a conventional practitioner only and 63% with both a conventional and CAM practitioner. CONCLUSIONS: Back pain is prevalent amongst mid-age Australian women, although only one third sought help. Women who sought help for their back pack were high users of CAM (practitioners and self-prescribed) and conventional care providers, consulting a CAM practitioner in complement with conventional biomedical consultations rather than as an alternative. Further research is needed to explore the complex contemporary landscapes of back pain negotiation and management. SN - 1873-6963 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22863641/Back_pain_amongst_mid_age_Australian_women:_a_longitudinal_analysis_of_provider_use_and_self_prescribed_treatments_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0965-2299(12)00081-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -