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Excess body weight and second primary cancer risk after breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies.
Breast Cancer Res Treat 2012; 135(3):647-54BC

Abstract

Several observational studies have investigated the role of body mass index (BMI) in second primary cancer incidence in women with breast cancer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence to assess the strength of this association. PubMed and Embase were searched for observational studies up to May 2012, and the reference lists of studies included in the analysis were examined. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen prospective studies, five cohort and eight nested case-control studies, were included. In categorical meta-analyses of BMI, obesity was associated to significantly increased risks of contralateral breast (RR = 1.37, 95 % CI: 1.20-1.57), breast (RR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.24-1.58), endometrial (RR = 1.96, 95 % CI: 1.43-2.70), and colorectal (RR = 1.89, 95 % CI: 1.28-2.79) second primary cancers. For a BMI increase of 5 kg/m(2), dose-response meta-analyses resulted in significantly increased RRs of 1.12 (95 % CI: 1.06-1.20) and 1.14 (95 % CI: 1.07-1.21) for contralateral breast and breast second primary cancers, respectively. The summary RR for endometrial second primary cancers was 1.46 (95 % CI: 1.17-1.83) for a 5-unit increment. This result emphasizes the importance of prevention policies aiming to reduce overweight and obesity prevalence. Clinical trials in breast cancer patients with excess body weight evaluating the effect of normal weight restoration on second primary cancer incidence are needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

INRA, UMR1125 Unité de Recherche en Epidémiologie Nutritionnelle, 93017 Bobigny, France. nathalie.pecollo@jouy.inra.frNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review
Systematic Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22864804

Citation

Druesne-Pecollo, Nathalie, et al. "Excess Body Weight and Second Primary Cancer Risk After Breast Cancer: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies." Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, vol. 135, no. 3, 2012, pp. 647-54.
Druesne-Pecollo N, Touvier M, Barrandon E, et al. Excess body weight and second primary cancer risk after breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012;135(3):647-54.
Druesne-Pecollo, N., Touvier, M., Barrandon, E., Chan, D. S., Norat, T., Zelek, L., ... Latino-Martel, P. (2012). Excess body weight and second primary cancer risk after breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. Breast Cancer Research and Treatment, 135(3), pp. 647-54. doi:10.1007/s10549-012-2187-1.
Druesne-Pecollo N, et al. Excess Body Weight and Second Primary Cancer Risk After Breast Cancer: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Prospective Studies. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2012;135(3):647-54. PubMed PMID: 22864804.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Excess body weight and second primary cancer risk after breast cancer: a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective studies. AU - Druesne-Pecollo,Nathalie, AU - Touvier,Mathilde, AU - Barrandon,Emilie, AU - Chan,Doris S M, AU - Norat,Teresa, AU - Zelek,Laurent, AU - Hercberg,Serge, AU - Latino-Martel,Paule, Y1 - 2012/08/05/ PY - 2012/03/26/received PY - 2012/07/23/accepted PY - 2012/8/7/entrez PY - 2012/8/7/pubmed PY - 2013/4/23/medline SP - 647 EP - 54 JF - Breast cancer research and treatment JO - Breast Cancer Res. Treat. VL - 135 IS - 3 N2 - Several observational studies have investigated the role of body mass index (BMI) in second primary cancer incidence in women with breast cancer. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of the evidence to assess the strength of this association. PubMed and Embase were searched for observational studies up to May 2012, and the reference lists of studies included in the analysis were examined. Random effects models were used to estimate summary relative risks (RRs) and 95 % confidence intervals (CIs). Thirteen prospective studies, five cohort and eight nested case-control studies, were included. In categorical meta-analyses of BMI, obesity was associated to significantly increased risks of contralateral breast (RR = 1.37, 95 % CI: 1.20-1.57), breast (RR = 1.40, 95 % CI: 1.24-1.58), endometrial (RR = 1.96, 95 % CI: 1.43-2.70), and colorectal (RR = 1.89, 95 % CI: 1.28-2.79) second primary cancers. For a BMI increase of 5 kg/m(2), dose-response meta-analyses resulted in significantly increased RRs of 1.12 (95 % CI: 1.06-1.20) and 1.14 (95 % CI: 1.07-1.21) for contralateral breast and breast second primary cancers, respectively. The summary RR for endometrial second primary cancers was 1.46 (95 % CI: 1.17-1.83) for a 5-unit increment. This result emphasizes the importance of prevention policies aiming to reduce overweight and obesity prevalence. Clinical trials in breast cancer patients with excess body weight evaluating the effect of normal weight restoration on second primary cancer incidence are needed. SN - 1573-7217 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22864804/Excess_body_weight_and_second_primary_cancer_risk_after_breast_cancer:_a_systematic_review_and_meta_analysis_of_prospective_studies_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10549-012-2187-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -