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Higher plasma homocysteine is associated with lower vitamin B6 status in critically ill surgical patients.
Nutr Clin Pract. 2012 Oct; 27(5):695-700.NC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Hyperhomocysteinemia might be at least partially due to compromised B vitamin status in critically ill patients and has been linked with critical illness. This study was conducted to examine the association between plasma homocysteine with B vitamins and clinical outcomes in critically ill surgical patients.

METHODS

Thirty-two patients in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) were enrolled. Disease severity (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score), hematological values, serum and erythrocyte folate, serum vitamin B₁₂, plasma, and erythrocyte pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) were determined within 24 hours of admission and again after 7 days.

RESULTS

The prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in the patients was either 46.9% (plasma homocysteine ≥12 µmol/L) or 31.3% (plasma homocysteine ≥15 µmol/L) on day 1 in the SICU and increased to 62.5% (plasma homocysteine ≥12 µmol/L) and 37.5% (plasma homocysteine ≥15 µmol/L) on day 7 after admission to the SICU. Plasma homocysteine, serum folate, and vitamin B₁₂ significantly increased by day 7, whereas plasma and erythrocyte PLP remained constant throughout the study. Plasma homocysteine was not correlated with serum folate and vitamin B₁₂. However, plasma and erythrocyte PLP on day 1 were adversely associated with day 1 levels of plasma homocysteine after adjusting for potential confounders. Plasma homocysteine on day 1 or changes (Δ day 7-day 1) did not show any association with clinical outcomes.

CONCLUSIONS

Lower plasma PLP might be a significant factor for increased plasma homocysteine in critically ill surgical patients. The association between plasma homocysteine and clinical outcomes was not found.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Critical Care, Changhua Christian Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22868281

Citation

Hou, Chen-Tai, et al. "Higher Plasma Homocysteine Is Associated With Lower Vitamin B6 Status in Critically Ill Surgical Patients." Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, vol. 27, no. 5, 2012, pp. 695-700.
Hou CT, Wu YH, Cheng CH, et al. Higher plasma homocysteine is associated with lower vitamin B6 status in critically ill surgical patients. Nutr Clin Pract. 2012;27(5):695-700.
Hou, C. T., Wu, Y. H., Cheng, C. H., Huang, P. N., & Huang, Y. C. (2012). Higher plasma homocysteine is associated with lower vitamin B6 status in critically ill surgical patients. Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition, 27(5), 695-700. https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533612449654
Hou CT, et al. Higher Plasma Homocysteine Is Associated With Lower Vitamin B6 Status in Critically Ill Surgical Patients. Nutr Clin Pract. 2012;27(5):695-700. PubMed PMID: 22868281.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Higher plasma homocysteine is associated with lower vitamin B6 status in critically ill surgical patients. AU - Hou,Chen-Tai, AU - Wu,Ying-Hsun, AU - Cheng,Chien-Hsiang, AU - Huang,Pei-Ning, AU - Huang,Yi-Chia, Y1 - 2012/08/06/ PY - 2012/8/8/entrez PY - 2012/8/8/pubmed PY - 2013/1/18/medline SP - 695 EP - 700 JF - Nutrition in clinical practice : official publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition JO - Nutr Clin Pract VL - 27 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Hyperhomocysteinemia might be at least partially due to compromised B vitamin status in critically ill patients and has been linked with critical illness. This study was conducted to examine the association between plasma homocysteine with B vitamins and clinical outcomes in critically ill surgical patients. METHODS: Thirty-two patients in the surgical intensive care unit (SICU) were enrolled. Disease severity (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score), hematological values, serum and erythrocyte folate, serum vitamin B₁₂, plasma, and erythrocyte pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) were determined within 24 hours of admission and again after 7 days. RESULTS: The prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia in the patients was either 46.9% (plasma homocysteine ≥12 µmol/L) or 31.3% (plasma homocysteine ≥15 µmol/L) on day 1 in the SICU and increased to 62.5% (plasma homocysteine ≥12 µmol/L) and 37.5% (plasma homocysteine ≥15 µmol/L) on day 7 after admission to the SICU. Plasma homocysteine, serum folate, and vitamin B₁₂ significantly increased by day 7, whereas plasma and erythrocyte PLP remained constant throughout the study. Plasma homocysteine was not correlated with serum folate and vitamin B₁₂. However, plasma and erythrocyte PLP on day 1 were adversely associated with day 1 levels of plasma homocysteine after adjusting for potential confounders. Plasma homocysteine on day 1 or changes (Δ day 7-day 1) did not show any association with clinical outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Lower plasma PLP might be a significant factor for increased plasma homocysteine in critically ill surgical patients. The association between plasma homocysteine and clinical outcomes was not found. SN - 1941-2452 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22868281/Higher_plasma_homocysteine_is_associated_with_lower_vitamin_B6_status_in_critically_ill_surgical_patients_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1177/0884533612449654 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -