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Association between pre-eclampsia and locally derived traffic-related air pollution: a retrospective cohort study.
J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013 Feb; 67(2):147-52.JE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Pre-eclampsia is a common complication of pregnancy and is a major cause of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. Despite a number of plausible mechanisms by which air pollutants might contribute to this process, few studies have investigated the association between pre-eclampsia and traffic emissions, a major contributor to air pollution in urban areas.

OBJECTIVE

The authors investigated the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of pre-eclampsia in a maternal population in the urban centre of Perth, Western Australia.

METHOD

The authors estimated maternal residential exposure to a marker for traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxide, NO(2)) during pregnancy for 23 452 births using temporally adjusted land-use regression. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations with pre-eclampsia.

RESULTS

Each IQR increase in levels of traffic-related air pollution in whole pregnancy and third trimester was associated with a 12% (1%-25%) and 30% (7%-58%) increased risk of pre-eclampsia, respectively. The largest effect sizes were observed for women aged younger than 20 years or 40 years or older, aboriginal women and women with pre-existing and gestational diabetes, for whom an IQR increase in traffic-related air pollution in whole pregnancy was associated with a 34% (5%-72%), 35% (0%-82%) and 53% (7%-219%) increase in risk of pre-eclampsia, respectively.

CONCLUSIONS

Elevated exposure to traffic-related air pollution in pregnancy was associated with increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Effect sizes were highest for elevated exposures in third trimester and among younger and older women, aboriginal women and women with diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Telethon Institute for Child Health Research, Centre for Child Health Research, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. pereirag@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22879639

Citation

Pereira, Gavin, et al. "Association Between Pre-eclampsia and Locally Derived Traffic-related Air Pollution: a Retrospective Cohort Study." Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, vol. 67, no. 2, 2013, pp. 147-52.
Pereira G, Haggar F, Shand AW, et al. Association between pre-eclampsia and locally derived traffic-related air pollution: a retrospective cohort study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013;67(2):147-52.
Pereira, G., Haggar, F., Shand, A. W., Bower, C., Cook, A., & Nassar, N. (2013). Association between pre-eclampsia and locally derived traffic-related air pollution: a retrospective cohort study. Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, 67(2), 147-52. https://doi.org/10.1136/jech-2011-200805
Pereira G, et al. Association Between Pre-eclampsia and Locally Derived Traffic-related Air Pollution: a Retrospective Cohort Study. J Epidemiol Community Health. 2013;67(2):147-52. PubMed PMID: 22879639.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association between pre-eclampsia and locally derived traffic-related air pollution: a retrospective cohort study. AU - Pereira,Gavin, AU - Haggar,Fatima, AU - Shand,Antonia W, AU - Bower,Carol, AU - Cook,Angus, AU - Nassar,Natasha, Y1 - 2012/08/09/ PY - 2012/8/11/entrez PY - 2012/8/11/pubmed PY - 2013/5/10/medline SP - 147 EP - 52 JF - Journal of epidemiology and community health JO - J Epidemiol Community Health VL - 67 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Pre-eclampsia is a common complication of pregnancy and is a major cause of fetal-maternal mortality and morbidity. Despite a number of plausible mechanisms by which air pollutants might contribute to this process, few studies have investigated the association between pre-eclampsia and traffic emissions, a major contributor to air pollution in urban areas. OBJECTIVE: The authors investigated the association between traffic-related air pollution and risk of pre-eclampsia in a maternal population in the urban centre of Perth, Western Australia. METHOD: The authors estimated maternal residential exposure to a marker for traffic-related air pollution (nitrogen dioxide, NO(2)) during pregnancy for 23 452 births using temporally adjusted land-use regression. Logistic regression was used to investigate associations with pre-eclampsia. RESULTS: Each IQR increase in levels of traffic-related air pollution in whole pregnancy and third trimester was associated with a 12% (1%-25%) and 30% (7%-58%) increased risk of pre-eclampsia, respectively. The largest effect sizes were observed for women aged younger than 20 years or 40 years or older, aboriginal women and women with pre-existing and gestational diabetes, for whom an IQR increase in traffic-related air pollution in whole pregnancy was associated with a 34% (5%-72%), 35% (0%-82%) and 53% (7%-219%) increase in risk of pre-eclampsia, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Elevated exposure to traffic-related air pollution in pregnancy was associated with increased risk of pre-eclampsia. Effect sizes were highest for elevated exposures in third trimester and among younger and older women, aboriginal women and women with diabetes. SN - 1470-2738 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22879639/Association_between_pre_eclampsia_and_locally_derived_traffic_related_air_pollution:_a_retrospective_cohort_study_ L2 - https://jech.bmj.com/lookup/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=22879639 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -