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Added versus accumulated sugars on color development and acrylamide formation in french-fried potato strips.
J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Sep 05; 60(35):8763-71.JA

Abstract

Added (glucose addition) versus accumulated (in situ sugar development via cold-temperature storage) sugar treatments were investigated in relation to acrylamide formation within fried potato strips at standardized levels of finish-fried color (Agtron color scores ranged from 36 to 84). The added sugar treatment exhibited a relatively reduced rate of acrylamide formation and generally possessed a lower and less variable acrylamide content (61-1290 ng/g) than the accumulated sugar scheme (61-2191 ng/g). In a subsequent experiment, added fructose applied to strip surfaces via dipping prior to frying favored acrylamide formation over color development relative to added glucose, for which the reverse trend was observed. Thus, where acrylamide differences were noted between added and accumulated sugar treatments (given equivalent Agtron color scores), this result was likely aided by the relative higher fructose content in strips of the accumulated sugar scheme rather than simply a greater relative concentration of total reducing sugars.

Authors+Show Affiliations

ConAgra Foods, Richland, Washington 99354, United States.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22881236

Citation

Higley, Jeremy, et al. "Added Versus Accumulated Sugars On Color Development and Acrylamide Formation in French-fried Potato Strips." Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, vol. 60, no. 35, 2012, pp. 8763-71.
Higley J, Kim JY, Huber KC, et al. Added versus accumulated sugars on color development and acrylamide formation in french-fried potato strips. J Agric Food Chem. 2012;60(35):8763-71.
Higley, J., Kim, J. Y., Huber, K. C., & Smith, G. (2012). Added versus accumulated sugars on color development and acrylamide formation in french-fried potato strips. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, 60(35), 8763-71. https://doi.org/10.1021/jf302114s
Higley J, et al. Added Versus Accumulated Sugars On Color Development and Acrylamide Formation in French-fried Potato Strips. J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Sep 5;60(35):8763-71. PubMed PMID: 22881236.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Added versus accumulated sugars on color development and acrylamide formation in french-fried potato strips. AU - Higley,Jeremy, AU - Kim,Jong-Yea, AU - Huber,Kerry C, AU - Smith,Gordon, Y1 - 2012/08/23/ PY - 2012/8/14/entrez PY - 2012/8/14/pubmed PY - 2013/1/8/medline SP - 8763 EP - 71 JF - Journal of agricultural and food chemistry JO - J Agric Food Chem VL - 60 IS - 35 N2 - Added (glucose addition) versus accumulated (in situ sugar development via cold-temperature storage) sugar treatments were investigated in relation to acrylamide formation within fried potato strips at standardized levels of finish-fried color (Agtron color scores ranged from 36 to 84). The added sugar treatment exhibited a relatively reduced rate of acrylamide formation and generally possessed a lower and less variable acrylamide content (61-1290 ng/g) than the accumulated sugar scheme (61-2191 ng/g). In a subsequent experiment, added fructose applied to strip surfaces via dipping prior to frying favored acrylamide formation over color development relative to added glucose, for which the reverse trend was observed. Thus, where acrylamide differences were noted between added and accumulated sugar treatments (given equivalent Agtron color scores), this result was likely aided by the relative higher fructose content in strips of the accumulated sugar scheme rather than simply a greater relative concentration of total reducing sugars. SN - 1520-5118 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22881236/Added_versus_accumulated_sugars_on_color_development_and_acrylamide_formation_in_french_fried_potato_strips_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1021/jf302114s DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -