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Cortisol responses to naturalistic and laboratory stress in student teachers: comparison with a non-stress control day.

Abstract

Ambulatory assessments of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to acute natural stressors yield evidence on stress regulation with high ecological validity. Sampling of salivary cortisol is a standard technique in this field. In 21 healthy student teachers, we assessed cortisol responses to a demonstration lesson. On a control day, sampling was repeated at analogous times. Additionally, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) was assessed on both days. Participants were also exposed to a laboratory stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test, and rated their individual levels of chronic work stress. In pre-to-post-stress assessment, cortisol levels declined after the lesson. However, post-stress cortisol levels were significantly higher compared with those on the control day. Also, the Trier Social Stress Test yielded higher cortisol responses when using the control day as reference baseline. Associations between the CAR and chronic stress measures were observed solely on the control day. There were no significant associations between cortisol responses to the natural and laboratory stressors. Our results indicate that a control day might be an important complement in laboratory but especially in ambulatory stress research. Furthermore, associations between chronic stress measures and the CAR might be obscured by acute stress exposure. Finally, responses to the laboratory stressor do not seem to mirror natural stress responses.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Jacobs Center on Lifelong Learning and Institutional Development, Jacobs University Bremen, Bremen, Germany.

    , ,

    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Analysis of Variance
    Burnout, Professional
    Circadian Rhythm
    Female
    Humans
    Hydrocortisone
    Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
    Linear Models
    Male
    Monitoring, Ambulatory
    Pituitary-Adrenal System
    Reference Values
    Research Design
    Saliva
    Stress, Psychological
    Students
    Teaching

    Pub Type(s)

    Comparative Study
    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    22888074

    Citation

    Wolfram, Maren, et al. "Cortisol Responses to Naturalistic and Laboratory Stress in Student Teachers: Comparison With a Non-stress Control Day." Stress and Health : Journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress, vol. 29, no. 2, 2013, pp. 143-9.
    Wolfram M, Bellingrath S, Feuerhahn N, et al. Cortisol responses to naturalistic and laboratory stress in student teachers: comparison with a non-stress control day. Stress Health. 2013;29(2):143-9.
    Wolfram, M., Bellingrath, S., Feuerhahn, N., & Kudielka, B. M. (2013). Cortisol responses to naturalistic and laboratory stress in student teachers: comparison with a non-stress control day. Stress and Health : Journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress, 29(2), pp. 143-9. doi:10.1002/smi.2439.
    Wolfram M, et al. Cortisol Responses to Naturalistic and Laboratory Stress in Student Teachers: Comparison With a Non-stress Control Day. Stress Health. 2013;29(2):143-9. PubMed PMID: 22888074.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Cortisol responses to naturalistic and laboratory stress in student teachers: comparison with a non-stress control day. AU - Wolfram,Maren, AU - Bellingrath,Silja, AU - Feuerhahn,Nicolas, AU - Kudielka,Brigitte M, Y1 - 2012/08/09/ PY - 2012/05/04/received PY - 2012/06/18/revised PY - 2012/06/18/accepted PY - 2012/8/14/entrez PY - 2012/8/14/pubmed PY - 2013/10/1/medline SP - 143 EP - 9 JF - Stress and health : journal of the International Society for the Investigation of Stress JO - Stress Health VL - 29 IS - 2 N2 - Ambulatory assessments of hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis responses to acute natural stressors yield evidence on stress regulation with high ecological validity. Sampling of salivary cortisol is a standard technique in this field. In 21 healthy student teachers, we assessed cortisol responses to a demonstration lesson. On a control day, sampling was repeated at analogous times. Additionally, the cortisol awakening response (CAR) was assessed on both days. Participants were also exposed to a laboratory stressor, the Trier Social Stress Test, and rated their individual levels of chronic work stress. In pre-to-post-stress assessment, cortisol levels declined after the lesson. However, post-stress cortisol levels were significantly higher compared with those on the control day. Also, the Trier Social Stress Test yielded higher cortisol responses when using the control day as reference baseline. Associations between the CAR and chronic stress measures were observed solely on the control day. There were no significant associations between cortisol responses to the natural and laboratory stressors. Our results indicate that a control day might be an important complement in laboratory but especially in ambulatory stress research. Furthermore, associations between chronic stress measures and the CAR might be obscured by acute stress exposure. Finally, responses to the laboratory stressor do not seem to mirror natural stress responses. SN - 1532-2998 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22888074/Cortisol_responses_to_naturalistic_and_laboratory_stress_in_student_teachers:_comparison_with_a_non_stress_control_day_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/smi.2439 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -