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Migraine and menstruation: a pilot study.
Cephalalgia. 1990 Dec; 10(6):305-10.C

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To define the term "menstrual" migraine and to determine the prevalence of "menstrual" migraine in women attending the City of London Migraine Clinic.

DESIGN

Women attending the clinic were asked to keep a record of their migraine attacks and menstrual periods for at least 3 complete menstrual cycles.

RESULTS

Fifty-five women completed the study. "Menstrual" migraine was defined as "migraine attacks which occur regularly on or between days -2 to +3 of the menstrual cycle and at no other time". Using this criterion, 4 (7.2%) of the women in our population had "menstrual" migraine. All 4 women had migraine without aura. A further 19 (34.5%) had an increased number of attacks at the time of menstruation in addition to attacks at other times of the cycle. Eighteen (32.7%) had attacks occurring throughout the cycle but with no increase in number at the time of menstruation. Fourteen (25.5%) had no attacks within the defined period during the 3 cycles studied.

DISCUSSION

A small percentage of women have attacks only occurring at the time of menstruation, which can be defined as true "menstrual" migraine. This group is most likely to respond to hormonal treatment. The group of 34.5% who have an increased number of attacks at the time of menstruation in addition to attacks at other times of the month could be defined as having "menstrually related" migraine and might well respond to hormonal therapy. The 32.7% who have attacks throughout the menstrual cycle without an increase at menstruation are unlikely to respond to hormonal therapy. The 25.5% who do not have attacks related to menstruation almost certainly will not respond to hormonal therapy.

Authors+Show Affiliations

City of London Migraine Clinic.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2289231

Citation

MacGregor, E A., et al. "Migraine and Menstruation: a Pilot Study." Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache, vol. 10, no. 6, 1990, pp. 305-10.
MacGregor EA, Chia H, Vohrah RC, et al. Migraine and menstruation: a pilot study. Cephalalgia. 1990;10(6):305-10.
MacGregor, E. A., Chia, H., Vohrah, R. C., & Wilkinson, M. (1990). Migraine and menstruation: a pilot study. Cephalalgia : an International Journal of Headache, 10(6), 305-10.
MacGregor EA, et al. Migraine and Menstruation: a Pilot Study. Cephalalgia. 1990;10(6):305-10. PubMed PMID: 2289231.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Migraine and menstruation: a pilot study. AU - MacGregor,E A, AU - Chia,H, AU - Vohrah,R C, AU - Wilkinson,M, PY - 1990/12/1/pubmed PY - 1990/12/1/medline PY - 1990/12/1/entrez SP - 305 EP - 10 JF - Cephalalgia : an international journal of headache JO - Cephalalgia VL - 10 IS - 6 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To define the term "menstrual" migraine and to determine the prevalence of "menstrual" migraine in women attending the City of London Migraine Clinic. DESIGN: Women attending the clinic were asked to keep a record of their migraine attacks and menstrual periods for at least 3 complete menstrual cycles. RESULTS: Fifty-five women completed the study. "Menstrual" migraine was defined as "migraine attacks which occur regularly on or between days -2 to +3 of the menstrual cycle and at no other time". Using this criterion, 4 (7.2%) of the women in our population had "menstrual" migraine. All 4 women had migraine without aura. A further 19 (34.5%) had an increased number of attacks at the time of menstruation in addition to attacks at other times of the cycle. Eighteen (32.7%) had attacks occurring throughout the cycle but with no increase in number at the time of menstruation. Fourteen (25.5%) had no attacks within the defined period during the 3 cycles studied. DISCUSSION: A small percentage of women have attacks only occurring at the time of menstruation, which can be defined as true "menstrual" migraine. This group is most likely to respond to hormonal treatment. The group of 34.5% who have an increased number of attacks at the time of menstruation in addition to attacks at other times of the month could be defined as having "menstrually related" migraine and might well respond to hormonal therapy. The 32.7% who have attacks throughout the menstrual cycle without an increase at menstruation are unlikely to respond to hormonal therapy. The 25.5% who do not have attacks related to menstruation almost certainly will not respond to hormonal therapy. SN - 0333-1024 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2289231/Migraine_and_menstruation:_a_pilot_study_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1046/j.1468-2982.1990.1006305.x?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -