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Epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases: the global picture.
Bull World Health Organ. 1990; 68(5):639-54.BW

Abstract

Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are now the commonest group of notifiable infectious diseases in most countries, particularly in the age group of 15 to 50 years and in infants. Their control is important considering the high incidence of acute infections, complications and sequelae, their socioeconomic impact, and their role in increasing transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The worldwide incidence of major bacterial and viral STD is estimated at over 125 million cases yearly. STD are hyperendemic in many developing countries. In industrialized countries, the bacterial STD (syphilis, gonorrhoea, chancroid) declined from the peak during the Second World War till up to the late fifties, then increased during the sixties and early seventies, and they have been decreasing again from the late seventies till the present. In the industrialized world, diseases due to Chlamydia trachomatis, genital herpes virus, human papillomaviruses and human immunodeficiency virus are now more important than the classical bacterial ones; both groups remain major health problems in most developing countries. Infection rates are similar in both women and men, but women and infants bear the major burden of complications and serious sequelae. Infertility and ectopic pregnancies are often a consequence of pelvic inflammatory disease, and are preventable. Sexually transmitted diseases in pregnant women can result in prematurity, stillbirth and neonatal infections. In many areas 1-5% of newborns are at risk of gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum, a blinding disease; congenital syphilis causes up to 25% of perinatal mortality. Genital and anal cancers (especially cervical cancer) are associated with viral sexually transmitted diseases (genital human papillomavirus and herpes virus infections). Urethral stricture and infertility are frequent sequelae in men.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Programme of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2289300

Citation

De Schryver, A, and A Meheus. "Epidemiology of Sexually Transmitted Diseases: the Global Picture." Bulletin of the World Health Organization, vol. 68, no. 5, 1990, pp. 639-54.
De Schryver A, Meheus A. Epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases: the global picture. Bull World Health Organ. 1990;68(5):639-54.
De Schryver, A., & Meheus, A. (1990). Epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases: the global picture. Bulletin of the World Health Organization, 68(5), 639-54.
De Schryver A, Meheus A. Epidemiology of Sexually Transmitted Diseases: the Global Picture. Bull World Health Organ. 1990;68(5):639-54. PubMed PMID: 2289300.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of sexually transmitted diseases: the global picture. AU - De Schryver,A, AU - Meheus,A, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez KW - Abortion, Spontaneous KW - Adnexitis KW - Age Distribution KW - Age Factors KW - Americas KW - Behavior KW - Biology KW - Birth Weight KW - Body Weight KW - Chlamydia KW - Demographic Factors KW - Denmark KW - Developed Countries KW - Developing Countries KW - Diseases KW - Epidemiologic Methods KW - Europe KW - Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Fetal Death KW - Gonorrhea KW - Incidence KW - Infections KW - Infertility KW - Laboratory Examinations And Diagnoses KW - Low Birth Weight KW - Measurement KW - Mortality KW - North America KW - Northern America KW - Northern Europe KW - Ophthalmological Effects KW - Pelvic Inflammatory Disease KW - Physiology KW - Population KW - Population Characteristics KW - Population Dynamics KW - Pregnancy Complications KW - Pregnancy, Ectopic KW - Prevalence KW - Prostitutes KW - Reproduction KW - Reproductive Tract Infections KW - Research Methodology KW - Scandinavia KW - Sex Behavior KW - Sexually Transmitted Diseases--complications KW - Sexually Transmitted Diseases--etiology KW - Sweden KW - Syphilis KW - United Kingdom KW - United States KW - World SP - 639 EP - 54 JF - Bulletin of the World Health Organization JO - Bull World Health Organ VL - 68 IS - 5 N2 - Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) are now the commonest group of notifiable infectious diseases in most countries, particularly in the age group of 15 to 50 years and in infants. Their control is important considering the high incidence of acute infections, complications and sequelae, their socioeconomic impact, and their role in increasing transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The worldwide incidence of major bacterial and viral STD is estimated at over 125 million cases yearly. STD are hyperendemic in many developing countries. In industrialized countries, the bacterial STD (syphilis, gonorrhoea, chancroid) declined from the peak during the Second World War till up to the late fifties, then increased during the sixties and early seventies, and they have been decreasing again from the late seventies till the present. In the industrialized world, diseases due to Chlamydia trachomatis, genital herpes virus, human papillomaviruses and human immunodeficiency virus are now more important than the classical bacterial ones; both groups remain major health problems in most developing countries. Infection rates are similar in both women and men, but women and infants bear the major burden of complications and serious sequelae. Infertility and ectopic pregnancies are often a consequence of pelvic inflammatory disease, and are preventable. Sexually transmitted diseases in pregnant women can result in prematurity, stillbirth and neonatal infections. In many areas 1-5% of newborns are at risk of gonococcal ophthalmia neonatorum, a blinding disease; congenital syphilis causes up to 25% of perinatal mortality. Genital and anal cancers (especially cervical cancer) are associated with viral sexually transmitted diseases (genital human papillomavirus and herpes virus infections). Urethral stricture and infertility are frequent sequelae in men. SN - 0042-9686 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2289300/Epidemiology_of_sexually_transmitted_diseases:_the_global_picture_ L2 - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/pmid/2289300/ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -