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Use of high-rate envelope speech cues and their perceptually relevant dynamic range for the hearing impaired.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2012 Aug; 132(2):1141-51.JA

Abstract

The ability of hearing-impaired (HI) listeners to use high-rate envelope information in a competing-talker situation was assessed. In experiment 1, signals were tone vocoded and the cutoff frequency (f(c)) of the envelope extraction filter was either 50 Hz (E filter) or 200 Hz (P filter). The channels for which the P or E filter was used were varied. Intelligibility was higher with the P filter regardless of whether it was used for low or high center frequencies. Performance was best when the P filter was used for all channels. Experiment 2 explored the dynamic range over which HI listeners made use of high-rate cues. In each channel of a vocoder, the envelope extracted using f(c) = 16 Hz was replaced by the envelope extracted using f(c) = 300 Hz, either at the peaks or valleys, with a parametrically varied "switching threshold." For a target-to-background ratio of +5 dB, changes in speech intelligibility occurred mainly when the switching threshold was between -8 and +8 dB relative to the channel root-mean-square level. This range is similar in width to, but about 3 dB higher in absolute level than, that found for normal-hearing listeners, despite the reduced dynamic range of the HI listeners.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Experimental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Downing Street, Cambridge CB2 3EB, England. mas19@cam.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22894233

Citation

Stone, Michael A., et al. "Use of High-rate Envelope Speech Cues and Their Perceptually Relevant Dynamic Range for the Hearing Impaired." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 132, no. 2, 2012, pp. 1141-51.
Stone MA, Anton K, Moore BC. Use of high-rate envelope speech cues and their perceptually relevant dynamic range for the hearing impaired. J Acoust Soc Am. 2012;132(2):1141-51.
Stone, M. A., Anton, K., & Moore, B. C. (2012). Use of high-rate envelope speech cues and their perceptually relevant dynamic range for the hearing impaired. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 132(2), 1141-51. https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4733543
Stone MA, Anton K, Moore BC. Use of High-rate Envelope Speech Cues and Their Perceptually Relevant Dynamic Range for the Hearing Impaired. J Acoust Soc Am. 2012;132(2):1141-51. PubMed PMID: 22894233.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Use of high-rate envelope speech cues and their perceptually relevant dynamic range for the hearing impaired. AU - Stone,Michael A, AU - Anton,Kristina, AU - Moore,Brian C J, PY - 2012/8/17/entrez PY - 2012/8/17/pubmed PY - 2013/1/17/medline SP - 1141 EP - 51 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 132 IS - 2 N2 - The ability of hearing-impaired (HI) listeners to use high-rate envelope information in a competing-talker situation was assessed. In experiment 1, signals were tone vocoded and the cutoff frequency (f(c)) of the envelope extraction filter was either 50 Hz (E filter) or 200 Hz (P filter). The channels for which the P or E filter was used were varied. Intelligibility was higher with the P filter regardless of whether it was used for low or high center frequencies. Performance was best when the P filter was used for all channels. Experiment 2 explored the dynamic range over which HI listeners made use of high-rate cues. In each channel of a vocoder, the envelope extracted using f(c) = 16 Hz was replaced by the envelope extracted using f(c) = 300 Hz, either at the peaks or valleys, with a parametrically varied "switching threshold." For a target-to-background ratio of +5 dB, changes in speech intelligibility occurred mainly when the switching threshold was between -8 and +8 dB relative to the channel root-mean-square level. This range is similar in width to, but about 3 dB higher in absolute level than, that found for normal-hearing listeners, despite the reduced dynamic range of the HI listeners. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22894233/Use_of_high_rate_envelope_speech_cues_and_their_perceptually_relevant_dynamic_range_for_the_hearing_impaired_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4733543 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -