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Self-perception but not peer reputation of bullying victimization is associated with non-clinical psychotic experiences in adolescents.
Psychol Med. 2013 Apr; 43(4):781-7.PM

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Bullying victimization may be linked to psychosis but only self-report measures of victimization have been used so far. This study aimed (a) to investigate the differential associations of peer-nominated versus self-reported victim status with non-clinical psychotic experiences in a sample of young adolescents, and (b) to examine whether different types of self-reported victimization predict non-clinical psychotic experiences in these adolescents. Method A combination of standard self-report and peer nomination procedures was used to assess victimization. The sample (n = 724) was divided into four groups (exclusively self-reported victims, self- and peer-reported victims, exclusively peer-reported victims, and non-victims) to test for a group effect on non-clinical psychotic experiences. The relationship between types of victimization and non-clinical psychotic experiences was examined by a regression analysis.

RESULTS

Self-reported victims, along with self- and peer-reported victims, scored higher than peer-reported victims and non-victims on non-clinical psychotic experiences. Self-reports of direct relational, indirect relational and physical victimization significantly improved the prediction of non-clinical psychotic experiences whereas verbal and possession-directed victimization had no significant predictive value.

CONCLUSIONS

The relationship between victimization and non-clinical psychotic experiences is only present for self-reported victimization, possibly indicative of an interpretation bias. The observed discrepancy between self-report and peer-report highlights the importance of implementing a combination of both measures for future research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Educational Neuroscience, Faculty of Psychology and Education, VU University Amsterdam, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22895003

Citation

Gromann, P M., et al. "Self-perception but Not Peer Reputation of Bullying Victimization Is Associated With Non-clinical Psychotic Experiences in Adolescents." Psychological Medicine, vol. 43, no. 4, 2013, pp. 781-7.
Gromann PM, Goossens FA, Olthof T, et al. Self-perception but not peer reputation of bullying victimization is associated with non-clinical psychotic experiences in adolescents. Psychol Med. 2013;43(4):781-7.
Gromann, P. M., Goossens, F. A., Olthof, T., Pronk, J., & Krabbendam, L. (2013). Self-perception but not peer reputation of bullying victimization is associated with non-clinical psychotic experiences in adolescents. Psychological Medicine, 43(4), 781-7. https://doi.org/10.1017/S003329171200178X
Gromann PM, et al. Self-perception but Not Peer Reputation of Bullying Victimization Is Associated With Non-clinical Psychotic Experiences in Adolescents. Psychol Med. 2013;43(4):781-7. PubMed PMID: 22895003.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Self-perception but not peer reputation of bullying victimization is associated with non-clinical psychotic experiences in adolescents. AU - Gromann,P M, AU - Goossens,F A, AU - Olthof,T, AU - Pronk,J, AU - Krabbendam,L, Y1 - 2012/08/16/ PY - 2012/8/17/entrez PY - 2012/8/17/pubmed PY - 2013/9/21/medline SP - 781 EP - 7 JF - Psychological medicine JO - Psychol Med VL - 43 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Bullying victimization may be linked to psychosis but only self-report measures of victimization have been used so far. This study aimed (a) to investigate the differential associations of peer-nominated versus self-reported victim status with non-clinical psychotic experiences in a sample of young adolescents, and (b) to examine whether different types of self-reported victimization predict non-clinical psychotic experiences in these adolescents. Method A combination of standard self-report and peer nomination procedures was used to assess victimization. The sample (n = 724) was divided into four groups (exclusively self-reported victims, self- and peer-reported victims, exclusively peer-reported victims, and non-victims) to test for a group effect on non-clinical psychotic experiences. The relationship between types of victimization and non-clinical psychotic experiences was examined by a regression analysis. RESULTS: Self-reported victims, along with self- and peer-reported victims, scored higher than peer-reported victims and non-victims on non-clinical psychotic experiences. Self-reports of direct relational, indirect relational and physical victimization significantly improved the prediction of non-clinical psychotic experiences whereas verbal and possession-directed victimization had no significant predictive value. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship between victimization and non-clinical psychotic experiences is only present for self-reported victimization, possibly indicative of an interpretation bias. The observed discrepancy between self-report and peer-report highlights the importance of implementing a combination of both measures for future research. SN - 1469-8978 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22895003/Self_perception_but_not_peer_reputation_of_bullying_victimization_is_associated_with_non_clinical_psychotic_experiences_in_adolescents_ L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S003329171200178X/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -