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Changing referral patterns of infectious corneal ulcers to a tertiary care facility in south India - 7-year analysis.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol 2012; 19(5):297-301OE

Abstract

PURPOSE

To report changing trends in referral patterns of microbial keratitis evidenced by laboratory results of culture-positive cases from a tertiary eye-care hospital in south India.

METHODS

All patients presenting with microbial (nonviral) keratitis to the cornea services of Aravind Eye Hospital from 2003 to 2009 were identified from a computerized database. Microbiologic characteristics were recorded and annual distributions of causative organisms over the 7-year study period were compared.

RESULTS

Out of a total of 3059 cases of presumed microbial keratitis, 1756 had positive cultures (57.4%). Among the culture-positive cases, fungal pathogens were isolated from 1224 cases (70%), 488 (27.7%) showed bacterial growth, 18 (1.03%) grew acanthamoeba species and 26 (1.5%) demonstrated mixed bacterial and fungal growth. The percentage of fungal isolates in culture-positive cases increased gradually over the study period from 59% in 2004 to 78% in 2009. This increase in frequency of fungal keratitis was statistically significant (P = 0.023). A proportionally decreasing trend was seen in the number of bacterial isolates ranging from 31% in 2003-2005 to 22% in 2009 (P = 0.04).

CONCLUSIONS

An incremental increase was seen in the number of fungal keratitis cases referred to our institute during the study period. Bacterial keratitis showed a decline. This disconcerting trend may lead to an increase in the incidence of corneal blindness in the developing world and thus warrants further research.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Cornea and Refractive Services, Aravind Eye Hospital and Post Graduate Institute of Ophthalmology, Pondicherry, India. drsunny1980@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22897620

Citation

Sengupta, Sabyasachi, et al. "Changing Referral Patterns of Infectious Corneal Ulcers to a Tertiary Care Facility in South India - 7-year Analysis." Ophthalmic Epidemiology, vol. 19, no. 5, 2012, pp. 297-301.
Sengupta S, Thiruvengadakrishnan K, Ravindran RD, et al. Changing referral patterns of infectious corneal ulcers to a tertiary care facility in south India - 7-year analysis. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2012;19(5):297-301.
Sengupta, S., Thiruvengadakrishnan, K., Ravindran, R. D., & Vaitilingam, M. C. (2012). Changing referral patterns of infectious corneal ulcers to a tertiary care facility in south India - 7-year analysis. Ophthalmic Epidemiology, 19(5), pp. 297-301. doi:10.3109/09286586.2012.690492.
Sengupta S, et al. Changing Referral Patterns of Infectious Corneal Ulcers to a Tertiary Care Facility in South India - 7-year Analysis. Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2012;19(5):297-301. PubMed PMID: 22897620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changing referral patterns of infectious corneal ulcers to a tertiary care facility in south India - 7-year analysis. AU - Sengupta,Sabyasachi, AU - Thiruvengadakrishnan,Krishnan, AU - Ravindran,Ravilla D, AU - Vaitilingam,Manivasagam C, Y1 - 2012/08/16/ PY - 2012/8/18/entrez PY - 2012/8/18/pubmed PY - 2012/12/21/medline SP - 297 EP - 301 JF - Ophthalmic epidemiology JO - Ophthalmic Epidemiol VL - 19 IS - 5 N2 - PURPOSE: To report changing trends in referral patterns of microbial keratitis evidenced by laboratory results of culture-positive cases from a tertiary eye-care hospital in south India. METHODS: All patients presenting with microbial (nonviral) keratitis to the cornea services of Aravind Eye Hospital from 2003 to 2009 were identified from a computerized database. Microbiologic characteristics were recorded and annual distributions of causative organisms over the 7-year study period were compared. RESULTS: Out of a total of 3059 cases of presumed microbial keratitis, 1756 had positive cultures (57.4%). Among the culture-positive cases, fungal pathogens were isolated from 1224 cases (70%), 488 (27.7%) showed bacterial growth, 18 (1.03%) grew acanthamoeba species and 26 (1.5%) demonstrated mixed bacterial and fungal growth. The percentage of fungal isolates in culture-positive cases increased gradually over the study period from 59% in 2004 to 78% in 2009. This increase in frequency of fungal keratitis was statistically significant (P = 0.023). A proportionally decreasing trend was seen in the number of bacterial isolates ranging from 31% in 2003-2005 to 22% in 2009 (P = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: An incremental increase was seen in the number of fungal keratitis cases referred to our institute during the study period. Bacterial keratitis showed a decline. This disconcerting trend may lead to an increase in the incidence of corneal blindness in the developing world and thus warrants further research. SN - 1744-5086 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22897620/Changing_referral_patterns_of_infectious_corneal_ulcers_to_a_tertiary_care_facility_in_south_India___7_year_analysis_ L2 - http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.3109/09286586.2012.690492 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -