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Blood cadmium, mercury, and lead and metabolic syndrome in South Korea: 2005-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
Am J Ind Med. 2013 Jun; 56(6):682-92.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010 regarding the association between levels of blood cadmium, mercury, and lead and metabolic syndrome (MS) in a representative sample of the adult South Korean population. MS is defined as a cluster of disorders including central obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high triglycerides.

METHODS

The analysis was restricted to participants ≥20 years of age who completed the health examination survey, including blood lead, cadmium, and mercury measurements. Odds ratios (ORs) for MS were calculated for log2 -transformed blood metal levels and tertiles thereof after covariate adjustment.

RESULTS

No significant results were observed in females. In males, adjusted ORs indicated that a doubling of blood cadmium resulted in a 23.0% increase in the risk of MS. Male subjects in the highest tertile of blood cadmium were 36.7% more likely to have MS versus those in the lowest tertile. There were no significant ORs for having MS or its components in any of the models of blood lead and mercury levels after covariate adjustment.

CONCLUSION

The association between blood cadmium level and MS was significant regardless of the type of variable (continuous or categorical) among men with lower blood cadmium levels. Thus, blood cadmium levels were robust risk factors for MS in men. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between cadmium exposure and MS.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Institute of Environmental and Occupational Medicine, Soonchunhyang University, Choongnam, South Korea.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22911659

Citation

Lee, Byung-Kook, and Yangho Kim. "Blood Cadmium, Mercury, and Lead and Metabolic Syndrome in South Korea: 2005-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey." American Journal of Industrial Medicine, vol. 56, no. 6, 2013, pp. 682-92.
Lee BK, Kim Y. Blood cadmium, mercury, and lead and metabolic syndrome in South Korea: 2005-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am J Ind Med. 2013;56(6):682-92.
Lee, B. K., & Kim, Y. (2013). Blood cadmium, mercury, and lead and metabolic syndrome in South Korea: 2005-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. American Journal of Industrial Medicine, 56(6), 682-92. https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22107
Lee BK, Kim Y. Blood Cadmium, Mercury, and Lead and Metabolic Syndrome in South Korea: 2005-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Am J Ind Med. 2013;56(6):682-92. PubMed PMID: 22911659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Blood cadmium, mercury, and lead and metabolic syndrome in South Korea: 2005-2010 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. AU - Lee,Byung-Kook, AU - Kim,Yangho, Y1 - 2012/08/21/ PY - 2012/07/27/accepted PY - 2012/8/23/entrez PY - 2012/8/23/pubmed PY - 2013/11/6/medline SP - 682 EP - 92 JF - American journal of industrial medicine JO - Am J Ind Med VL - 56 IS - 6 N2 - INTRODUCTION: We present data from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2005-2010 regarding the association between levels of blood cadmium, mercury, and lead and metabolic syndrome (MS) in a representative sample of the adult South Korean population. MS is defined as a cluster of disorders including central obesity, glucose intolerance, hypertension, low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and high triglycerides. METHODS: The analysis was restricted to participants ≥20 years of age who completed the health examination survey, including blood lead, cadmium, and mercury measurements. Odds ratios (ORs) for MS were calculated for log2 -transformed blood metal levels and tertiles thereof after covariate adjustment. RESULTS: No significant results were observed in females. In males, adjusted ORs indicated that a doubling of blood cadmium resulted in a 23.0% increase in the risk of MS. Male subjects in the highest tertile of blood cadmium were 36.7% more likely to have MS versus those in the lowest tertile. There were no significant ORs for having MS or its components in any of the models of blood lead and mercury levels after covariate adjustment. CONCLUSION: The association between blood cadmium level and MS was significant regardless of the type of variable (continuous or categorical) among men with lower blood cadmium levels. Thus, blood cadmium levels were robust risk factors for MS in men. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an association between cadmium exposure and MS. SN - 1097-0274 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22911659/Blood_cadmium_mercury_and_lead_and_metabolic_syndrome_in_South_Korea:_2005_2010_Korean_National_Health_and_Nutrition_Examination_Survey_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/ajim.22107 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -