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Association of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive subjects with metabolic syndrome defined by three different definitions.
JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc. 2011 Oct-Dec; 51(184):157-63.JJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Different authorities have put forward their criteria to define metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of MetS in hypertensive individuals by the available three different definitions from National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), International diabetes Federation (IDF) and WHO and their association with other cardiac risk factors.

METHODS

After anthropometric measurements fasting blood was analyzed for glucose, lipids, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and anti-oxidized LDL antibody in 150 hypertensive individuals. A ten-year coronary heart disease risk was predicted using the Framingham risk score (FRS).

RESULTS

The prevalence of MetS was 54.7 % by NCEP, 42.0 % by IDF) and 18.7 % by WHO. As many as 63.4 % had MetS by any definition, while only 9.4 % fulfilled all the criteria of the three definitions. The association of cardiac risk factors also varied according to the definition used. hsCRP was significantly elevated in MetS compared to non-MetS. Body mass index, waist circumference and HDL-C were associated in MetS defined by NCEP and IDF. FRS was higher in MetS defined by Adult Treatment Panel and WHO definitions. An increase in urine albumin and a decrease in eGFR were associated with MetS individuals defined by WHO only.

CONCLUSION

There is a wide variation in the prevalence of MetS and associated cardiac risk factors according to three different definitions used. The different cardiac risk factors among MetS also vary with the definitions used. However, hsCRP and emerging risk factor are significantly elevated in hypertensive individuals with MetS as defined by all definitions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Biochemistry, Nepal Medical College, Kathmandu, Nepal.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22922894

Citation

Shrestha, R, et al. "Association of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hypertensive Subjects With Metabolic Syndrome Defined By Three Different Definitions." JNMA; Journal of the Nepal Medical Association, vol. 51, no. 184, 2011, pp. 157-63.
Shrestha R, Jha SC, Khanal M, et al. Association of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive subjects with metabolic syndrome defined by three different definitions. JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc. 2011;51(184):157-63.
Shrestha, R., Jha, S. C., Khanal, M., Gyawali, P., Yadav, B. K., & Jha, B. (2011). Association of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive subjects with metabolic syndrome defined by three different definitions. JNMA; Journal of the Nepal Medical Association, 51(184), 157-63.
Shrestha R, et al. Association of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Hypertensive Subjects With Metabolic Syndrome Defined By Three Different Definitions. JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc. 2011 Oct-Dec;51(184):157-63. PubMed PMID: 22922894.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Association of cardiovascular risk factors in hypertensive subjects with metabolic syndrome defined by three different definitions. AU - Shrestha,R, AU - Jha,S C, AU - Khanal,M, AU - Gyawali,P, AU - Yadav,B K, AU - Jha,B, PY - 2012/8/28/entrez PY - 2012/8/28/pubmed PY - 2013/1/9/medline SP - 157 EP - 63 JF - JNMA; journal of the Nepal Medical Association JO - JNMA J Nepal Med Assoc VL - 51 IS - 184 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Different authorities have put forward their criteria to define metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to find the prevalence of MetS in hypertensive individuals by the available three different definitions from National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), International diabetes Federation (IDF) and WHO and their association with other cardiac risk factors. METHODS: After anthropometric measurements fasting blood was analyzed for glucose, lipids, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and anti-oxidized LDL antibody in 150 hypertensive individuals. A ten-year coronary heart disease risk was predicted using the Framingham risk score (FRS). RESULTS: The prevalence of MetS was 54.7 % by NCEP, 42.0 % by IDF) and 18.7 % by WHO. As many as 63.4 % had MetS by any definition, while only 9.4 % fulfilled all the criteria of the three definitions. The association of cardiac risk factors also varied according to the definition used. hsCRP was significantly elevated in MetS compared to non-MetS. Body mass index, waist circumference and HDL-C were associated in MetS defined by NCEP and IDF. FRS was higher in MetS defined by Adult Treatment Panel and WHO definitions. An increase in urine albumin and a decrease in eGFR were associated with MetS individuals defined by WHO only. CONCLUSION: There is a wide variation in the prevalence of MetS and associated cardiac risk factors according to three different definitions used. The different cardiac risk factors among MetS also vary with the definitions used. However, hsCRP and emerging risk factor are significantly elevated in hypertensive individuals with MetS as defined by all definitions. SN - 0028-2715 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22922894/Association_of_cardiovascular_risk_factors_in_hypertensive_subjects_with_metabolic_syndrome_defined_by_three_different_definitions_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/metabolicsyndrome.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -