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Urinary isoflavonoids and risk of coronary heart disease.
Int J Epidemiol. 2012 Oct; 41(5):1367-75.IJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Whether soy food consumption may protect against coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. No previous study has used biomarkers of soy intake in assessing the relationship between soy consumption and CHD. Biomarkers that reflect both intake and metabolism may be more informative than self-reports of dietary intake.

METHODS

We examined associations of urinary isoflavonoids, a biomarker of soy or soy isoflavone intake, with risk of CHD in a case-control study nested within two prospective cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai. Cases were defined as subjects with no history of CHD at baseline who developed incident CHD during follow-up. Control subjects were randomly selected from those who remained free of CHD and matched to cases by sex, age, date and time of sample collection and antibiotic use. Baseline urinary isoflavonoids (daidzein, genistein, glycitein, equol, O-desmethylangolensin, dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein) were compared between cases (n = 377) and control subjects (n = 753). Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations.

RESULTS

Total urinary isoflavonoids were not associated with CHD in either women or men. However, urinary equol excretion showed a significant inverse association with CHD in women. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for CHD across increasing quartiles of equol levels in women were 1 (reference), 0.61 (0.32, 1.15), 0.51 (0.26, 0.98) and 0.46 (0.24, 0.89) (P = 0.02 for trend).

CONCLUSIONS

Our study suggests for the first time that equol, a bioactive metabolite of soy isoflavone daidzein, may be inversely associated with risk of CHD in women.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt Epidemiology Center, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN 37203-1738, USA. xianglan.zhang@vanderbilt.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22927214

Citation

Zhang, Xianglan, et al. "Urinary Isoflavonoids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease." International Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 41, no. 5, 2012, pp. 1367-75.
Zhang X, Gao YT, Yang G, et al. Urinary isoflavonoids and risk of coronary heart disease. Int J Epidemiol. 2012;41(5):1367-75.
Zhang, X., Gao, Y. T., Yang, G., Li, H., Cai, Q., Xiang, Y. B., Ji, B. T., Franke, A. A., Zheng, W., & Shu, X. O. (2012). Urinary isoflavonoids and risk of coronary heart disease. International Journal of Epidemiology, 41(5), 1367-75. https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dys130
Zhang X, et al. Urinary Isoflavonoids and Risk of Coronary Heart Disease. Int J Epidemiol. 2012;41(5):1367-75. PubMed PMID: 22927214.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Urinary isoflavonoids and risk of coronary heart disease. AU - Zhang,Xianglan, AU - Gao,Yu-Tang, AU - Yang,Gong, AU - Li,Honglan, AU - Cai,Qiuyin, AU - Xiang,Yong-Bing, AU - Ji,Bu-Tian, AU - Franke,Adrian A, AU - Zheng,Wei, AU - Shu,Xiao-Ou, Y1 - 2012/08/27/ PY - 2012/8/29/entrez PY - 2012/8/29/pubmed PY - 2013/3/6/medline SP - 1367 EP - 75 JF - International journal of epidemiology JO - Int J Epidemiol VL - 41 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: Whether soy food consumption may protect against coronary heart disease (CHD) remains controversial. No previous study has used biomarkers of soy intake in assessing the relationship between soy consumption and CHD. Biomarkers that reflect both intake and metabolism may be more informative than self-reports of dietary intake. METHODS: We examined associations of urinary isoflavonoids, a biomarker of soy or soy isoflavone intake, with risk of CHD in a case-control study nested within two prospective cohort studies of Chinese adults in Shanghai. Cases were defined as subjects with no history of CHD at baseline who developed incident CHD during follow-up. Control subjects were randomly selected from those who remained free of CHD and matched to cases by sex, age, date and time of sample collection and antibiotic use. Baseline urinary isoflavonoids (daidzein, genistein, glycitein, equol, O-desmethylangolensin, dihydrodaidzein and dihydrogenistein) were compared between cases (n = 377) and control subjects (n = 753). Conditional logistic regression was used to evaluate the associations. RESULTS: Total urinary isoflavonoids were not associated with CHD in either women or men. However, urinary equol excretion showed a significant inverse association with CHD in women. The adjusted odds ratios (95% confidence intervals) for CHD across increasing quartiles of equol levels in women were 1 (reference), 0.61 (0.32, 1.15), 0.51 (0.26, 0.98) and 0.46 (0.24, 0.89) (P = 0.02 for trend). CONCLUSIONS: Our study suggests for the first time that equol, a bioactive metabolite of soy isoflavone daidzein, may be inversely associated with risk of CHD in women. SN - 1464-3685 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22927214/Urinary_isoflavonoids_and_risk_of_coronary_heart_disease_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ije/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ije/dys130 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -