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The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology.
Psychiatr Clin North Am 2012; 35(3):571-84PC

Abstract

The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that the disruption of early brain development increases the risk of later developing schizophrenia. This hypothesis focuses attention on critical periods of early brain development. From an epidemiologic perspective, various prenatal and perinatal risk factors have been linked to schizophrenia, including exposures related to infection, nutrition, and obstetric complications. From a genetic perspective, candidate genes have also been linked to altered brain development. In recent decades evidence from neuropathology has provided support for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis. Animal models involving early life exposures have been linked to changes in these same brain systems, providing convergent evidence for this long-standing hypothesis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Biomedical Science, University of Queensland, St Lucia, Queensland 4072, Australia.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22929867

Citation

Piper, Michael, et al. "The Neurodevelopmental Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: Convergent Clues From Epidemiology and Neuropathology." The Psychiatric Clinics of North America, vol. 35, no. 3, 2012, pp. 571-84.
Piper M, Beneyto M, Burne TH, et al. The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology. Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2012;35(3):571-84.
Piper, M., Beneyto, M., Burne, T. H., Eyles, D. W., Lewis, D. A., & McGrath, J. J. (2012). The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology. The Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 35(3), pp. 571-84. doi:10.1016/j.psc.2012.06.002.
Piper M, et al. The Neurodevelopmental Hypothesis of Schizophrenia: Convergent Clues From Epidemiology and Neuropathology. Psychiatr Clin North Am. 2012;35(3):571-84. PubMed PMID: 22929867.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology. AU - Piper,Michael, AU - Beneyto,Monica, AU - Burne,Thomas H J, AU - Eyles,Darryl W, AU - Lewis,David A, AU - McGrath,John J, Y1 - 2012/07/15/ PY - 2012/8/30/entrez PY - 2012/8/30/pubmed PY - 2013/1/15/medline SP - 571 EP - 84 JF - The Psychiatric clinics of North America JO - Psychiatr. Clin. North Am. VL - 35 IS - 3 N2 - The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that the disruption of early brain development increases the risk of later developing schizophrenia. This hypothesis focuses attention on critical periods of early brain development. From an epidemiologic perspective, various prenatal and perinatal risk factors have been linked to schizophrenia, including exposures related to infection, nutrition, and obstetric complications. From a genetic perspective, candidate genes have also been linked to altered brain development. In recent decades evidence from neuropathology has provided support for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis. Animal models involving early life exposures have been linked to changes in these same brain systems, providing convergent evidence for this long-standing hypothesis. SN - 1558-3147 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22929867/The_neurodevelopmental_hypothesis_of_schizophrenia:_convergent_clues_from_epidemiology_and_neuropathology_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0193-953X(12)00051-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -