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Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to vitamin D3 supplementation 50,000 IU monthly in youth with HIV-1 infection.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012 Nov; 97(11):4004-13.JC

Abstract

CONTEXT

Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency occur frequently in youth with HIV infection, particularly among those receiving the antiretroviral drug efavirenz. Optimal vitamin D dosing for treatment is unclear.

OBJECTIVE

Our objective was to evaluate safety and measure change in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration from baseline to study wk 4 and 12 during treatment with vitamin D(3), 50,000 IU monthly.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS

We conducted a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial of HIV-infected youth ages 18-24 yr, with viral load below 5000 copies/ml, on stable antiretroviral therapy.

INTERVENTION

INTERVENTION included vitamin D(3), 50,000 IU (n = 102), or matching placebo (n = 101) administered in three directly observed oral doses at monthly intervals.

RESULTS

At baseline, mean (sd) age was 20.9 (2.0) yr; 37% were female and 52% African-American, and 54% were vitamin D deficient/insufficient (25-OHD < 20 ng/ml), with no randomized group differences. Of evaluable participants vitamin D deficient/insufficient at baseline who were administered vitamin D, 43 of 46 (93%) had sufficient 25-OHD by wk 12. Vitamin D supplementation increased 25-OHD serum concentration from a baseline of 21.9 (13.3) to 35.9 (19.1) ng/ml at wk 12 (P < 0.001) with no change for placebo. Although use of the antiretroviral efavirenz was associated with lower baseline 25-OHD concentration, efavirenz did not diminish the response to vitamin D supplementation. There was no treatment-related toxicity.

CONCLUSIONS

Supplementation with vitamin D(3) 50,000 IU monthly for three doses was safe. Increases in 25-OHD occurred in treated participants regardless of antiretroviral regimen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Pediatric Infectious Diseases, Suite C450, P.O. Box 1997, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53201-1997, USA. phavens@mcw.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22933542

Citation

Havens, Peter L., et al. "Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Response to Vitamin D3 Supplementation 50,000 IU Monthly in Youth With HIV-1 Infection." The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, vol. 97, no. 11, 2012, pp. 4004-13.
Havens PL, Mulligan K, Hazra R, et al. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to vitamin D3 supplementation 50,000 IU monthly in youth with HIV-1 infection. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012;97(11):4004-13.
Havens, P. L., Mulligan, K., Hazra, R., Flynn, P., Rutledge, B., Van Loan, M. D., Lujan-Zilbermann, J., Kapogiannis, B. G., Wilson, C. M., & Stephensen, C. B. (2012). Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to vitamin D3 supplementation 50,000 IU monthly in youth with HIV-1 infection. The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 97(11), 4004-13. https://doi.org/10.1210/jc.2012-2600
Havens PL, et al. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D Response to Vitamin D3 Supplementation 50,000 IU Monthly in Youth With HIV-1 Infection. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2012;97(11):4004-13. PubMed PMID: 22933542.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D response to vitamin D3 supplementation 50,000 IU monthly in youth with HIV-1 infection. AU - Havens,Peter L, AU - Mulligan,Kathleen, AU - Hazra,Rohan, AU - Flynn,Patricia, AU - Rutledge,Brandy, AU - Van Loan,Marta D, AU - Lujan-Zilbermann,Jorge, AU - Kapogiannis,Bill G, AU - Wilson,Craig M, AU - Stephensen,Charles B, AU - ,, Y1 - 2012/08/29/ PY - 2012/8/31/entrez PY - 2012/8/31/pubmed PY - 2013/1/26/medline SP - 4004 EP - 13 JF - The Journal of clinical endocrinology and metabolism JO - J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. VL - 97 IS - 11 N2 - CONTEXT: Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency occur frequently in youth with HIV infection, particularly among those receiving the antiretroviral drug efavirenz. Optimal vitamin D dosing for treatment is unclear. OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate safety and measure change in 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD) concentration from baseline to study wk 4 and 12 during treatment with vitamin D(3), 50,000 IU monthly. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: We conducted a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial of HIV-infected youth ages 18-24 yr, with viral load below 5000 copies/ml, on stable antiretroviral therapy. INTERVENTION: INTERVENTION included vitamin D(3), 50,000 IU (n = 102), or matching placebo (n = 101) administered in three directly observed oral doses at monthly intervals. RESULTS: At baseline, mean (sd) age was 20.9 (2.0) yr; 37% were female and 52% African-American, and 54% were vitamin D deficient/insufficient (25-OHD < 20 ng/ml), with no randomized group differences. Of evaluable participants vitamin D deficient/insufficient at baseline who were administered vitamin D, 43 of 46 (93%) had sufficient 25-OHD by wk 12. Vitamin D supplementation increased 25-OHD serum concentration from a baseline of 21.9 (13.3) to 35.9 (19.1) ng/ml at wk 12 (P < 0.001) with no change for placebo. Although use of the antiretroviral efavirenz was associated with lower baseline 25-OHD concentration, efavirenz did not diminish the response to vitamin D supplementation. There was no treatment-related toxicity. CONCLUSIONS: Supplementation with vitamin D(3) 50,000 IU monthly for three doses was safe. Increases in 25-OHD occurred in treated participants regardless of antiretroviral regimen. SN - 1945-7197 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22933542/Serum_25_hydroxyvitamin_D_response_to_vitamin_D3_supplementation_50000_IU_monthly_in_youth_with_HIV_1_infection_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-lookup/doi/10.1210/jc.2012-2600 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -