Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Perceptions matter: beliefs about influenza vaccine and vaccination behavior among elderly white, black and Hispanic Americans.
Vaccine. 2012 Nov 06; 30(48):6927-34.V

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Knowledge and beliefs about influenza vaccine that differ across racial or ethnic groups may promote racial or ethnic disparities in vaccination.

OBJECTIVE

To identify associations between vaccination behavior and personal beliefs about influenza vaccine by race or ethnicity and education levels among the U.S. elderly population.

METHODS

Data from a national telephone survey conducted in 2004 were used for this study. Responses for 3875 adults ≥ 65 years of age were analyzed using logistic regression methods.

RESULTS

Racial and ethnic differences in beliefs were observed. For example, whites were more likely to believe influenza vaccine is very effective in preventing influenza compared to blacks and Hispanics (whites, 60%; blacks, 47%, and Hispanics, 51%, p<0.01). Among adults who believed the vaccine is very effective, self-reported vaccination was substantially higher across all racial/ethnic groups (whites, 93%; blacks, 76%; Hispanics, 78%) compared to adults who believed the vaccine was only somewhat effective (whites 67%; blacks 61%, Hispanics 61%). Also, vaccination coverage differed by education level and personal beliefs of whites, blacks, and Hispanics.

CONCLUSIONS

Knowledge and beliefs about influenza vaccine may be important determinants of influenza vaccination among racial/ethnic groups. Strategies to increase coverage should highlight the burden of influenza disease in racial and ethnic populations, the benefits and safety of vaccinations and personal vulnerability to influenza disease if not vaccinated. For greater effectiveness, factors associated with the education levels of some communities may need to be considered when developing or implementing new strategies that target specific racial or ethnic groups.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Immunization Services Division, 1600 Clifton Road MS-A19, Atlanta, GA 30030, USA. KWooten@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22939908

Citation

Wooten, Karen G., et al. "Perceptions Matter: Beliefs About Influenza Vaccine and Vaccination Behavior Among Elderly White, Black and Hispanic Americans." Vaccine, vol. 30, no. 48, 2012, pp. 6927-34.
Wooten KG, Wortley PM, Singleton JA, et al. Perceptions matter: beliefs about influenza vaccine and vaccination behavior among elderly white, black and Hispanic Americans. Vaccine. 2012;30(48):6927-34.
Wooten, K. G., Wortley, P. M., Singleton, J. A., & Euler, G. L. (2012). Perceptions matter: beliefs about influenza vaccine and vaccination behavior among elderly white, black and Hispanic Americans. Vaccine, 30(48), 6927-34. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.vaccine.2012.08.036
Wooten KG, et al. Perceptions Matter: Beliefs About Influenza Vaccine and Vaccination Behavior Among Elderly White, Black and Hispanic Americans. Vaccine. 2012 Nov 6;30(48):6927-34. PubMed PMID: 22939908.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Perceptions matter: beliefs about influenza vaccine and vaccination behavior among elderly white, black and Hispanic Americans. AU - Wooten,Karen G, AU - Wortley,Pascale M, AU - Singleton,James A, AU - Euler,Gary L, Y1 - 2012/08/30/ PY - 2011/11/01/received PY - 2012/08/14/revised PY - 2012/08/16/accepted PY - 2012/9/4/entrez PY - 2012/9/4/pubmed PY - 2013/4/13/medline SP - 6927 EP - 34 JF - Vaccine JO - Vaccine VL - 30 IS - 48 N2 - BACKGROUND: Knowledge and beliefs about influenza vaccine that differ across racial or ethnic groups may promote racial or ethnic disparities in vaccination. OBJECTIVE: To identify associations between vaccination behavior and personal beliefs about influenza vaccine by race or ethnicity and education levels among the U.S. elderly population. METHODS: Data from a national telephone survey conducted in 2004 were used for this study. Responses for 3875 adults ≥ 65 years of age were analyzed using logistic regression methods. RESULTS: Racial and ethnic differences in beliefs were observed. For example, whites were more likely to believe influenza vaccine is very effective in preventing influenza compared to blacks and Hispanics (whites, 60%; blacks, 47%, and Hispanics, 51%, p<0.01). Among adults who believed the vaccine is very effective, self-reported vaccination was substantially higher across all racial/ethnic groups (whites, 93%; blacks, 76%; Hispanics, 78%) compared to adults who believed the vaccine was only somewhat effective (whites 67%; blacks 61%, Hispanics 61%). Also, vaccination coverage differed by education level and personal beliefs of whites, blacks, and Hispanics. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge and beliefs about influenza vaccine may be important determinants of influenza vaccination among racial/ethnic groups. Strategies to increase coverage should highlight the burden of influenza disease in racial and ethnic populations, the benefits and safety of vaccinations and personal vulnerability to influenza disease if not vaccinated. For greater effectiveness, factors associated with the education levels of some communities may need to be considered when developing or implementing new strategies that target specific racial or ethnic groups. SN - 1873-2518 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22939908/Perceptions_matter:_beliefs_about_influenza_vaccine_and_vaccination_behavior_among_elderly_white_black_and_Hispanic_Americans_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264-410X(12)01229-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -