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Dose-dependent absorption of chlorogenic acids in the small intestine assessed by coffee consumption in ileostomists.
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012 Oct; 56(10):1488-500.MN

Abstract

SCOPE

Until now, the question of how the ingested doses of chlorogenic acids (CGA) from coffee influence their absorption and metabolism remains unresolved. To assess absorption in the small intestine, we performed a dose-response study with a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design with ileostomist subjects.

METHODS AND RESULTS

After a polyphenol-free diet, the volunteers consumed, on three separate occasions, coffee with different total CGA contents (high 4525 μmol; medium 2219 μmol; low 1053 μmol). CGA concentrations in plasma, ileal effluent, and urine were subsequently determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS and -ESI-MS/MS. The results show that the consumption of higher CGA concentrations leads to a faster ileal excretion. This corresponds to a renal excretion of 8.0 ± 4.9% (high), 12.1 ± 6.7% (medium), and 14.6 ± 6.8% (low) of total CGA and metabolites. Glucuronidation of CGA became slightly greater with increasing dose. After enzyme treatment, the area under the curve (AUC)(0-8h) for CGA metabolites in plasma was 4412 ± 751 nM × h(0-8) (-1) (high), 2394 ± 637 nM × h(0-8) (-1) (medium), 1782 ± 731 nM × h(0-8) (-1) (low), respectively. Additionally, we were able to identify new metabolites of CGA in urine and ileal fluid.

CONCLUSION

We conclude that the consumption of high CGA concentrations via coffee might influence the gastrointestinal transit time and consequently affect CGA absorption and metabolism.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food Chemistry and Toxicology, Molecular Nutrition, University of Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse 52, Kaiserslautern, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22945604

Citation

Erk, Thomas, et al. "Dose-dependent Absorption of Chlorogenic Acids in the Small Intestine Assessed By Coffee Consumption in Ileostomists." Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, vol. 56, no. 10, 2012, pp. 1488-500.
Erk T, Williamson G, Renouf M, et al. Dose-dependent absorption of chlorogenic acids in the small intestine assessed by coffee consumption in ileostomists. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012;56(10):1488-500.
Erk, T., Williamson, G., Renouf, M., Marmet, C., Steiling, H., Dionisi, F., Barron, D., Melcher, R., & Richling, E. (2012). Dose-dependent absorption of chlorogenic acids in the small intestine assessed by coffee consumption in ileostomists. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research, 56(10), 1488-500. https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201200222
Erk T, et al. Dose-dependent Absorption of Chlorogenic Acids in the Small Intestine Assessed By Coffee Consumption in Ileostomists. Mol Nutr Food Res. 2012;56(10):1488-500. PubMed PMID: 22945604.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dose-dependent absorption of chlorogenic acids in the small intestine assessed by coffee consumption in ileostomists. AU - Erk,Thomas, AU - Williamson,Gary, AU - Renouf,Mathieu, AU - Marmet,Cynthia, AU - Steiling,Heike, AU - Dionisi,Fabiola, AU - Barron,Denis, AU - Melcher,Ralf, AU - Richling,Elke, Y1 - 2012/09/04/ PY - 2012/04/19/received PY - 2012/07/06/revised PY - 2012/07/26/accepted PY - 2012/9/5/entrez PY - 2012/9/5/pubmed PY - 2013/2/12/medline SP - 1488 EP - 500 JF - Molecular nutrition & food research JO - Mol Nutr Food Res VL - 56 IS - 10 N2 - SCOPE: Until now, the question of how the ingested doses of chlorogenic acids (CGA) from coffee influence their absorption and metabolism remains unresolved. To assess absorption in the small intestine, we performed a dose-response study with a randomized, double-blinded, crossover design with ileostomist subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: After a polyphenol-free diet, the volunteers consumed, on three separate occasions, coffee with different total CGA contents (high 4525 μmol; medium 2219 μmol; low 1053 μmol). CGA concentrations in plasma, ileal effluent, and urine were subsequently determined by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS and -ESI-MS/MS. The results show that the consumption of higher CGA concentrations leads to a faster ileal excretion. This corresponds to a renal excretion of 8.0 ± 4.9% (high), 12.1 ± 6.7% (medium), and 14.6 ± 6.8% (low) of total CGA and metabolites. Glucuronidation of CGA became slightly greater with increasing dose. After enzyme treatment, the area under the curve (AUC)(0-8h) for CGA metabolites in plasma was 4412 ± 751 nM × h(0-8) (-1) (high), 2394 ± 637 nM × h(0-8) (-1) (medium), 1782 ± 731 nM × h(0-8) (-1) (low), respectively. Additionally, we were able to identify new metabolites of CGA in urine and ileal fluid. CONCLUSION: We conclude that the consumption of high CGA concentrations via coffee might influence the gastrointestinal transit time and consequently affect CGA absorption and metabolism. SN - 1613-4133 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22945604/Dose_dependent_absorption_of_chlorogenic_acids_in_the_small_intestine_assessed_by_coffee_consumption_in_ileostomists_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/mnfr.201200222 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -