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Changes in plasma thiol levels induced by different phases of treatment in breast cancer; the role of commercial extract from black chokeberry.
Mol Cell Biochem 2013; 372(1-2):47-55MC

Abstract

Different low-molecular-weight thiols, including glutathione, cysteine, and cysteinylglycine are physiological free radical scavengers. On the other hand, homocysteine may play a role as an oxidant. The aim of our present study was to establish in vitro the effects of the commercial extract of Aronia melanocarpa (Aronox(®)) on the amount of selected low-molecular-weight thiols and the activity of antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in plasma obtained from patients with invasive breast cancer during different phases of treatment [before or after the surgery and patients after different phases of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide)] and from healthy subjects. Patients were hospitalized in Department of Oncological Surgery and Department of Chemotherapy, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. The level of low-molecular-weight thiols was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. We observed that in the presence of the Aronia extract changes in amount of thiols in plasma from breast cancer patients (at all tested groups) were significantly reduced. Our results showed that tested commercial extract reduced modifications of antioxidative enzymes activity in plasma from patients during different phases of treatment, but this effect was not statistical significant. Our results suggest that the Aronia extract supplementation in breast cancer patients has a beneficial effect on thiols concentration in plasma. Plasma, as reported in this work, could be used as an experimental model to evaluate the beneficial action of plant supplements, including phenolic extracts on thiols or other molecules during different phases of treatment.

Authors+Show Affiliations

The Department of General Biochemistry, Faculty of Biology and Environmental Protection, University of Lodz, Pomorska 141/3, 90-236 Lodz, Poland.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22949034

Citation

Kędzierska, Magdalena, et al. "Changes in Plasma Thiol Levels Induced By Different Phases of Treatment in Breast Cancer; the Role of Commercial Extract From Black Chokeberry." Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, vol. 372, no. 1-2, 2013, pp. 47-55.
Kędzierska M, Głowacki R, Czernek U, et al. Changes in plasma thiol levels induced by different phases of treatment in breast cancer; the role of commercial extract from black chokeberry. Mol Cell Biochem. 2013;372(1-2):47-55.
Kędzierska, M., Głowacki, R., Czernek, U., Szydłowska-Pazera, K., Potemski, P., Piekarski, J., ... Olas, B. (2013). Changes in plasma thiol levels induced by different phases of treatment in breast cancer; the role of commercial extract from black chokeberry. Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry, 372(1-2), pp. 47-55. doi:10.1007/s11010-012-1444-2.
Kędzierska M, et al. Changes in Plasma Thiol Levels Induced By Different Phases of Treatment in Breast Cancer; the Role of Commercial Extract From Black Chokeberry. Mol Cell Biochem. 2013;372(1-2):47-55. PubMed PMID: 22949034.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Changes in plasma thiol levels induced by different phases of treatment in breast cancer; the role of commercial extract from black chokeberry. AU - Kędzierska,Magdalena, AU - Głowacki,Rafał, AU - Czernek,Urszula, AU - Szydłowska-Pazera,Katarzyna, AU - Potemski,Piotr, AU - Piekarski,Janusz, AU - Jeziorski,Arkadiusz, AU - Olas,Beata, Y1 - 2012/09/05/ PY - 2012/06/19/received PY - 2012/08/25/accepted PY - 2012/9/6/entrez PY - 2012/9/6/pubmed PY - 2013/5/17/medline SP - 47 EP - 55 JF - Molecular and cellular biochemistry JO - Mol. Cell. Biochem. VL - 372 IS - 1-2 N2 - Different low-molecular-weight thiols, including glutathione, cysteine, and cysteinylglycine are physiological free radical scavengers. On the other hand, homocysteine may play a role as an oxidant. The aim of our present study was to establish in vitro the effects of the commercial extract of Aronia melanocarpa (Aronox(®)) on the amount of selected low-molecular-weight thiols and the activity of antioxidative enzymes (superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione reductase) in plasma obtained from patients with invasive breast cancer during different phases of treatment [before or after the surgery and patients after different phases of chemotherapy (doxorubicin and cyclophosphamide)] and from healthy subjects. Patients were hospitalized in Department of Oncological Surgery and Department of Chemotherapy, Medical University of Lodz, Poland. The level of low-molecular-weight thiols was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. We observed that in the presence of the Aronia extract changes in amount of thiols in plasma from breast cancer patients (at all tested groups) were significantly reduced. Our results showed that tested commercial extract reduced modifications of antioxidative enzymes activity in plasma from patients during different phases of treatment, but this effect was not statistical significant. Our results suggest that the Aronia extract supplementation in breast cancer patients has a beneficial effect on thiols concentration in plasma. Plasma, as reported in this work, could be used as an experimental model to evaluate the beneficial action of plant supplements, including phenolic extracts on thiols or other molecules during different phases of treatment. SN - 1573-4919 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22949034/Changes_in_plasma_thiol_levels_induced_by_different_phases_of_treatment_in_breast_cancer L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s11010-012-1444-2 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -