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[Two cases of acute hepatitis associated with Q fever].
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2012 Jul; 46(3):480-7.MB

Abstract

Q fever which is caused by Coxiella burnetii, is a worldwide zoonosis. Many species of wild and domestic mammals, birds, and arthropods, are reservoirs of C.burnetii in nature, however farm animals are the most frequent sources of human infection. The most frequent way of transmission is by inhalation of contaminated aerosols. The clinical presentation of Q fever is polymorphic and nonspecific. Q fever may present as acute or chronic disease. In acute cases, the most common clinical syndromes are selflimited febrile illness, granulomatous hepatitis, and pneumonia, but it can also be asymptomatic. Fever with hepatitis associated with Q fever has rarely been described in the literature. Herein we report two cases of C.burnetii hepatitis presented with jaundice. In May 2011, two male cases, who inhabited in Malkara village of Tekirdag province (located at Trace region of Turkey), were admitted to the hospital with the complaints of persistent high grade fever, chills and sweats, icterus, disseminated myalgia and headache. Physical examination revealed fever, icterus and the patient appeared to be mildly ill but had no localizing signs of infection. Radiological findings of the patients were in normal limits. Laboratory findings revealed leukocytosis, increased hepatic and cholestatic enzyme levels, and moderate hyperbilirubinemia- mainly direct bilirubin, whereas serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were found normal. Blood and urine cultures of the patients yielded no bacterial growth. Serological markers for acute viral hepatitis, citomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections, brucellosis, salmonellosis, toxoplasmosis and leptospirosis were found negative. Acute Q fever diagnosis of the cases were based on the positive results obtained by C.burnetii Phase II IgM and IgG ELISA (Vircell SL, Spain) test, and the serological diagnosis were confirmed by Phase I and II immunofluorescence (Vircell SL, Spain) method. Both cases were treated with doxycycline for 14 days and became afebrile within four days. These cases were presented to emphasize that C.burnetii infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with fever and elevated serum transaminase levels, irrespective of the presence of abdominal pain and exposure to potentially infected animals.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Tekirdağ State Hospital, Infectious Diseases Clinic, Tekirdağ, Turkey.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
English Abstract
Journal Article

Language

tur

PubMed ID

22951661

Citation

Yeşilyurt, Murat, et al. "[Two Cases of Acute Hepatitis Associated With Q Fever]." Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni, vol. 46, no. 3, 2012, pp. 480-7.
Yeşilyurt M, Kılıç S, Gürsoy B, et al. [Two cases of acute hepatitis associated with Q fever]. Mikrobiyol Bul. 2012;46(3):480-7.
Yeşilyurt, M., Kılıç, S., Gürsoy, B., Celebi, B., & Yerer, M. (2012). [Two cases of acute hepatitis associated with Q fever]. Mikrobiyoloji Bulteni, 46(3), 480-7.
Yeşilyurt M, et al. [Two Cases of Acute Hepatitis Associated With Q Fever]. Mikrobiyol Bul. 2012;46(3):480-7. PubMed PMID: 22951661.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - [Two cases of acute hepatitis associated with Q fever]. AU - Yeşilyurt,Murat, AU - Kılıç,Selçuk, AU - Gürsoy,Bensu, AU - Celebi,Bekir, AU - Yerer,Mehmet, PY - 2012/9/7/entrez PY - 2012/9/7/pubmed PY - 2013/7/26/medline SP - 480 EP - 7 JF - Mikrobiyoloji bulteni JO - Mikrobiyol Bul VL - 46 IS - 3 N2 - Q fever which is caused by Coxiella burnetii, is a worldwide zoonosis. Many species of wild and domestic mammals, birds, and arthropods, are reservoirs of C.burnetii in nature, however farm animals are the most frequent sources of human infection. The most frequent way of transmission is by inhalation of contaminated aerosols. The clinical presentation of Q fever is polymorphic and nonspecific. Q fever may present as acute or chronic disease. In acute cases, the most common clinical syndromes are selflimited febrile illness, granulomatous hepatitis, and pneumonia, but it can also be asymptomatic. Fever with hepatitis associated with Q fever has rarely been described in the literature. Herein we report two cases of C.burnetii hepatitis presented with jaundice. In May 2011, two male cases, who inhabited in Malkara village of Tekirdag province (located at Trace region of Turkey), were admitted to the hospital with the complaints of persistent high grade fever, chills and sweats, icterus, disseminated myalgia and headache. Physical examination revealed fever, icterus and the patient appeared to be mildly ill but had no localizing signs of infection. Radiological findings of the patients were in normal limits. Laboratory findings revealed leukocytosis, increased hepatic and cholestatic enzyme levels, and moderate hyperbilirubinemia- mainly direct bilirubin, whereas serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were found normal. Blood and urine cultures of the patients yielded no bacterial growth. Serological markers for acute viral hepatitis, citomegalovirus and Epstein-Barr virus infections, brucellosis, salmonellosis, toxoplasmosis and leptospirosis were found negative. Acute Q fever diagnosis of the cases were based on the positive results obtained by C.burnetii Phase II IgM and IgG ELISA (Vircell SL, Spain) test, and the serological diagnosis were confirmed by Phase I and II immunofluorescence (Vircell SL, Spain) method. Both cases were treated with doxycycline for 14 days and became afebrile within four days. These cases were presented to emphasize that C.burnetii infection should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with fever and elevated serum transaminase levels, irrespective of the presence of abdominal pain and exposure to potentially infected animals. SN - 0374-9096 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22951661/[Two_cases_of_acute_hepatitis_associated_with_Q_fever]_ L2 - http://www.diseaseinfosearch.org/result/6127 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -