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Effect of dietary fat saturation and cholesterol on LDL composition and metabolism. In vivo studies of receptor and nonreceptor-mediated catabolism of LDL in cebus monkeys.
Arteriosclerosis 1990 Jan-Feb; 10(1):119-28A

Abstract

The mechanism(s) by which polyunsaturated fats reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B were investigated in 20 cebus monkeys (Cebus albifrons) fed diets containing corn oil or coconut oil as fat (31% of calories) with or without dietary cholesterol (0.1% by weight) for 3 to 10 years. Coconut-oil feeding compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in significant increases in levels of plasma total cholesterol (176%), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-LDL cholesterol (236%), high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (148%), apo B (78%), and apo A-I (112%). The addition of dietary cholesterol to corn oil compared to corn oil alone resulted in smaller, but significant, increases in levels of total cholesterol (44%), HDL cholesterol (40%), and apo A-I (33%). Although the increases in VLDL-LDL cholesterol were of similar magnitude (52%), they barely failed to reach statistical significance (p less than 0.08), while the changes in apo B levels were negligible. The addition of dietary cholesterol to coconut oil, compared to coconut oil alone, resulted in no significant changes in lipoprotein cholesterol or apoproteins, although levels of VLDL-LDL cholesterol and apo B values increased 22% and 16%, respectively. Although hepatic free cholesterol content was not altered by diet, coconut-oil compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in significant increases in hepatic cholesteryl esters (236%) and triglycerides (325%), the latter increasing still further when dietary cholesterol was added to coconut oil (563%). To further assess the effects of these dietary changes on LDL metabolism, radioiodinated normal and glucosylated LDL kinetics were performed. The production rate of LDL apo B was not altered by diet. With corn-oil feeding, 63% of LDL catabolism was via the receptor-mediated pathway. Coconut-oil compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in a 50% decrease in receptor-mediated LDL apo B fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and a 27% reduction in nonreceptor-mediated LDL apo B FCR. The addition of dietary cholesterol to corn oil, compared to corn oil alone, resulted in no significant effect on LDL apo B catabolism. The addition of dietary cholesterol to coconut oil, compared to coconut oil alone, was associated with no significant change in nonreceptor catabolism of LDL apo B but with a 58% decrease in receptor-mediated catabolism of LDL (p less than 0.059). The diet-induced alterations of LDL catabolism were significantly correlated with hepatic lipids, which were enriched in saturated fatty acids.(

ABSTRACT

TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Clinical Sciences, University of Lowell, Massachusetts 01854.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2297342

Citation

Nicolosi, R J., et al. "Effect of Dietary Fat Saturation and Cholesterol On LDL Composition and Metabolism. in Vivo Studies of Receptor and Nonreceptor-mediated Catabolism of LDL in Cebus Monkeys." Arteriosclerosis (Dallas, Tex.), vol. 10, no. 1, 1990, pp. 119-28.
Nicolosi RJ, Stucchi AF, Kowala MC, et al. Effect of dietary fat saturation and cholesterol on LDL composition and metabolism. In vivo studies of receptor and nonreceptor-mediated catabolism of LDL in cebus monkeys. Arteriosclerosis. 1990;10(1):119-28.
Nicolosi, R. J., Stucchi, A. F., Kowala, M. C., Hennessy, L. K., Hegsted, D. M., & Schaefer, E. J. (1990). Effect of dietary fat saturation and cholesterol on LDL composition and metabolism. In vivo studies of receptor and nonreceptor-mediated catabolism of LDL in cebus monkeys. Arteriosclerosis (Dallas, Tex.), 10(1), pp. 119-28.
Nicolosi RJ, et al. Effect of Dietary Fat Saturation and Cholesterol On LDL Composition and Metabolism. in Vivo Studies of Receptor and Nonreceptor-mediated Catabolism of LDL in Cebus Monkeys. Arteriosclerosis. 1990;10(1):119-28. PubMed PMID: 2297342.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effect of dietary fat saturation and cholesterol on LDL composition and metabolism. In vivo studies of receptor and nonreceptor-mediated catabolism of LDL in cebus monkeys. AU - Nicolosi,R J, AU - Stucchi,A F, AU - Kowala,M C, AU - Hennessy,L K, AU - Hegsted,D M, AU - Schaefer,E J, PY - 1990/1/1/pubmed PY - 1990/1/1/medline PY - 1990/1/1/entrez SP - 119 EP - 28 JF - Arteriosclerosis (Dallas, Tex.) JO - Arteriosclerosis VL - 10 IS - 1 N2 - The mechanism(s) by which polyunsaturated fats reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein (apo) B were investigated in 20 cebus monkeys (Cebus albifrons) fed diets containing corn oil or coconut oil as fat (31% of calories) with or without dietary cholesterol (0.1% by weight) for 3 to 10 years. Coconut-oil feeding compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in significant increases in levels of plasma total cholesterol (176%), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL)-LDL cholesterol (236%), high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (148%), apo B (78%), and apo A-I (112%). The addition of dietary cholesterol to corn oil compared to corn oil alone resulted in smaller, but significant, increases in levels of total cholesterol (44%), HDL cholesterol (40%), and apo A-I (33%). Although the increases in VLDL-LDL cholesterol were of similar magnitude (52%), they barely failed to reach statistical significance (p less than 0.08), while the changes in apo B levels were negligible. The addition of dietary cholesterol to coconut oil, compared to coconut oil alone, resulted in no significant changes in lipoprotein cholesterol or apoproteins, although levels of VLDL-LDL cholesterol and apo B values increased 22% and 16%, respectively. Although hepatic free cholesterol content was not altered by diet, coconut-oil compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in significant increases in hepatic cholesteryl esters (236%) and triglycerides (325%), the latter increasing still further when dietary cholesterol was added to coconut oil (563%). To further assess the effects of these dietary changes on LDL metabolism, radioiodinated normal and glucosylated LDL kinetics were performed. The production rate of LDL apo B was not altered by diet. With corn-oil feeding, 63% of LDL catabolism was via the receptor-mediated pathway. Coconut-oil compared to corn-oil feeding resulted in a 50% decrease in receptor-mediated LDL apo B fractional catabolic rate (FCR) and a 27% reduction in nonreceptor-mediated LDL apo B FCR. The addition of dietary cholesterol to corn oil, compared to corn oil alone, resulted in no significant effect on LDL apo B catabolism. The addition of dietary cholesterol to coconut oil, compared to coconut oil alone, was associated with no significant change in nonreceptor catabolism of LDL apo B but with a 58% decrease in receptor-mediated catabolism of LDL (p less than 0.059). The diet-induced alterations of LDL catabolism were significantly correlated with hepatic lipids, which were enriched in saturated fatty acids.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) SN - 0276-5047 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2297342/Effect_of_dietary_fat_saturation_and_cholesterol_on_LDL_composition_and_metabolism__In_vivo_studies_of_receptor_and_nonreceptor_mediated_catabolism_of_LDL_in_cebus_monkeys_ L2 - http://ovidsp.ovid.com/ovidweb.cgi?T=JS&PAGE=linkout&SEARCH=2297342.ui DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -