Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A prospective study of stomach cancer and its relation to diet, cigarettes, and alcohol consumption.
Cancer Res 1990; 50(3):627-31CR

Abstract

From 1965 to 1968 in Hawaii, 7990 American men of Japanese ancestry were interviewed and examined in a cohort study. The intake of 20 separate foods in a food frequency questionnaire and the intake of carbohydrate and other nutrients, based on a 24-h diet recall history, were recorded. Since then, 150 incident cases of stomach cancer have been identified. Although men with stomach cancer (cases) consumed pickles and ham/bacon/sausages more often and fruits and fried vegetables less often than men without cancer (noncases), none of the differences was statistically significant. Current cigarette smokers had an increased risk (relative risk = 2.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.8 to 4.1) compared with nonsmokers, but there was no dose-response effect with heavier cigarette smoking. The consumption of alcohol, either from beer, spirits, or wine, did not affect the incidence of stomach cancer. The failure to detect an association with dietary foods in this study may be due to the omission of many oriental foods in the questionnaire and the limitations of the 24-h diet recall history.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Japan-Hawaii Cancer Study, Kuakini Medical Center, Honolulu 96817.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

2297702

Citation

Nomura, A, et al. "A Prospective Study of Stomach Cancer and Its Relation to Diet, Cigarettes, and Alcohol Consumption." Cancer Research, vol. 50, no. 3, 1990, pp. 627-31.
Nomura A, Grove JS, Stemmermann GN, et al. A prospective study of stomach cancer and its relation to diet, cigarettes, and alcohol consumption. Cancer Res. 1990;50(3):627-31.
Nomura, A., Grove, J. S., Stemmermann, G. N., & Severson, R. K. (1990). A prospective study of stomach cancer and its relation to diet, cigarettes, and alcohol consumption. Cancer Research, 50(3), pp. 627-31.
Nomura A, et al. A Prospective Study of Stomach Cancer and Its Relation to Diet, Cigarettes, and Alcohol Consumption. Cancer Res. 1990 Feb 1;50(3):627-31. PubMed PMID: 2297702.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of stomach cancer and its relation to diet, cigarettes, and alcohol consumption. AU - Nomura,A, AU - Grove,J S, AU - Stemmermann,G N, AU - Severson,R K, PY - 1990/2/1/pubmed PY - 1990/2/1/medline PY - 1990/2/1/entrez SP - 627 EP - 31 JF - Cancer research JO - Cancer Res. VL - 50 IS - 3 N2 - From 1965 to 1968 in Hawaii, 7990 American men of Japanese ancestry were interviewed and examined in a cohort study. The intake of 20 separate foods in a food frequency questionnaire and the intake of carbohydrate and other nutrients, based on a 24-h diet recall history, were recorded. Since then, 150 incident cases of stomach cancer have been identified. Although men with stomach cancer (cases) consumed pickles and ham/bacon/sausages more often and fruits and fried vegetables less often than men without cancer (noncases), none of the differences was statistically significant. Current cigarette smokers had an increased risk (relative risk = 2.7; 95% confidence interval = 1.8 to 4.1) compared with nonsmokers, but there was no dose-response effect with heavier cigarette smoking. The consumption of alcohol, either from beer, spirits, or wine, did not affect the incidence of stomach cancer. The failure to detect an association with dietary foods in this study may be due to the omission of many oriental foods in the questionnaire and the limitations of the 24-h diet recall history. SN - 0008-5472 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/2297702/A_prospective_study_of_stomach_cancer_and_its_relation_to_diet_cigarettes_and_alcohol_consumption_ L2 - http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=2297702 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -