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Dairy consumption and incidence of hypertension: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.
Hypertension. 2012 Nov; 60(5):1131-7.H

Abstract

Observational and clinical studies suggest that dairy intake, particularly low-fat dairy, could have a beneficial effect on blood pressure. We performed a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies on dairy intake and risk of hypertension in the general population. A systematic literature search for eligible studies was conducted until July 2011, using literature databases and hand search. Study-specific dose-response associations were computed according to the generalized least squares for trend estimation method, and linear and piecewise regression models were created. Random-effects models were performed with summarized dose-response data. We included 9 studies with a sample size of 57 256, a total of 15 367 incident hypertension cases, and a follow-up time between 2 and 15 years. Total dairy (9 studies; range of intake, ≈100-700 g/d), low-fat dairy (6 studies; ≈100-500 g/d), and milk (7 studies; ≈100-500 g/d) were inversely and linearly associated with a lower risk of hypertension. The pooled relative risks per 200 g/d were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.99) for total dairy, 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93-0.99) for low-fat dairy, and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94-0.98) for milk. High-fat dairy (6 studies), total fermented dairy (4 studies), yogurt (5 studies), and cheese (8 studies) were not significantly associated with hypertension incidence (pooled relative risks of ≈1). This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies suggests that low-fat dairy and milk could contribute to the prevention of hypertension, which needs confirmation in randomized controlled trials.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Wageningen University, Division of Human Nutrition, PO Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands. sabita.soedamah-muthu@wur.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22987924

Citation

Soedamah-Muthu, Sabita S., et al. "Dairy Consumption and Incidence of Hypertension: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies." Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), vol. 60, no. 5, 2012, pp. 1131-7.
Soedamah-Muthu SS, Verberne LD, Ding EL, et al. Dairy consumption and incidence of hypertension: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Hypertension. 2012;60(5):1131-7.
Soedamah-Muthu, S. S., Verberne, L. D., Ding, E. L., Engberink, M. F., & Geleijnse, J. M. (2012). Dairy consumption and incidence of hypertension: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979), 60(5), 1131-7. https://doi.org/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.195206
Soedamah-Muthu SS, et al. Dairy Consumption and Incidence of Hypertension: a Dose-response Meta-analysis of Prospective Cohort Studies. Hypertension. 2012;60(5):1131-7. PubMed PMID: 22987924.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dairy consumption and incidence of hypertension: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. AU - Soedamah-Muthu,Sabita S, AU - Verberne,Lisa D M, AU - Ding,Eric L, AU - Engberink,Mariëlle F, AU - Geleijnse,Johanna M, Y1 - 2012/09/17/ PY - 2012/9/19/entrez PY - 2012/9/19/pubmed PY - 2013/1/11/medline SP - 1131 EP - 7 JF - Hypertension (Dallas, Tex. : 1979) JO - Hypertension VL - 60 IS - 5 N2 - Observational and clinical studies suggest that dairy intake, particularly low-fat dairy, could have a beneficial effect on blood pressure. We performed a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies on dairy intake and risk of hypertension in the general population. A systematic literature search for eligible studies was conducted until July 2011, using literature databases and hand search. Study-specific dose-response associations were computed according to the generalized least squares for trend estimation method, and linear and piecewise regression models were created. Random-effects models were performed with summarized dose-response data. We included 9 studies with a sample size of 57 256, a total of 15 367 incident hypertension cases, and a follow-up time between 2 and 15 years. Total dairy (9 studies; range of intake, ≈100-700 g/d), low-fat dairy (6 studies; ≈100-500 g/d), and milk (7 studies; ≈100-500 g/d) were inversely and linearly associated with a lower risk of hypertension. The pooled relative risks per 200 g/d were 0.97 (95% CI, 0.95-0.99) for total dairy, 0.96 (95% CI, 0.93-0.99) for low-fat dairy, and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.94-0.98) for milk. High-fat dairy (6 studies), total fermented dairy (4 studies), yogurt (5 studies), and cheese (8 studies) were not significantly associated with hypertension incidence (pooled relative risks of ≈1). This meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies suggests that low-fat dairy and milk could contribute to the prevention of hypertension, which needs confirmation in randomized controlled trials. SN - 1524-4563 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22987924/Dairy_consumption_and_incidence_of_hypertension:_a_dose_response_meta_analysis_of_prospective_cohort_studies_ L2 - https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/HYPERTENSIONAHA.112.195206?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -