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No association between neuropathy and restless legs in Parkinson's disease.
Acta Neurol Scand. 2013 Mar; 127(3):216-20.AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) has been studied extensively in Parkinson's disease (PD), with conflicting findings. More recently, both neuropathy and leg motor restlessness (LMR) have been found to be significantly more prevalent in PD patients than in controls.

AIMS

Our objective was to determine whether RLS or LMR may be secondary to neuropathy, or its currently postulated determinants, cumulative levodopa usage and vitamin B(12) metabolism, in patients with PD.

MATERIALS AND METHODS

We compared prevalence of RLS, LMR and neuropathy in 37 PD patients and 37 age- and gender-matched controls. Correlations between RLS/LMR and neuropathy and symptomatic neuropathy, cumulative levodopa usage and vitamin B(12) levels were ascertained.

RESULTS

RLS prevalence was comparable in PD patients and controls (16.2% vs 10.8%; P = 0.30). LMR was significantly more common in PD patients than in controls (40.5% vs 16.2%; P = 0.038), as was neuropathy (37.8% vs 8.1%; P = 0.005). Neither RLS, nor LMR correlated with neuropathy or symptomatic neuropathy, cumulative levodopa exposure or serum vitamin B(12) levels in patients with PD. There was a non-significant trend for a correlation between LMR and earlier age of onset of PD (P = 0.069).

CONCLUSIONS

RLS and LMR appear unrelated to neuropathy or symptomatic neuropathy, cumulative levodopa usage, or serum vitamin B(12) levels in patients with PD. The occurrence of LMR may relate to the earlier onset of PD, raising the possibility of common pathophysiological mechanisms for PD and RLS, of which LMR may be an early manifestation in some patients.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK. yusuf.rajabally@uhl-tr.nhs.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22989006

Citation

Rajabally, Y A., and J Martey. "No Association Between Neuropathy and Restless Legs in Parkinson's Disease." Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, vol. 127, no. 3, 2013, pp. 216-20.
Rajabally YA, Martey J. No association between neuropathy and restless legs in Parkinson's disease. Acta Neurol Scand. 2013;127(3):216-20.
Rajabally, Y. A., & Martey, J. (2013). No association between neuropathy and restless legs in Parkinson's disease. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica, 127(3), 216-20. https://doi.org/10.1111/ane.12011
Rajabally YA, Martey J. No Association Between Neuropathy and Restless Legs in Parkinson's Disease. Acta Neurol Scand. 2013;127(3):216-20. PubMed PMID: 22989006.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - No association between neuropathy and restless legs in Parkinson's disease. AU - Rajabally,Y A, AU - Martey,J, Y1 - 2012/09/18/ PY - 2012/03/08/received PY - 2012/08/14/accepted PY - 2012/9/20/entrez PY - 2012/9/20/pubmed PY - 2013/8/10/medline SP - 216 EP - 20 JF - Acta neurologica Scandinavica JO - Acta Neurol Scand VL - 127 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: The prevalence of restless legs syndrome (RLS) has been studied extensively in Parkinson's disease (PD), with conflicting findings. More recently, both neuropathy and leg motor restlessness (LMR) have been found to be significantly more prevalent in PD patients than in controls. AIMS: Our objective was to determine whether RLS or LMR may be secondary to neuropathy, or its currently postulated determinants, cumulative levodopa usage and vitamin B(12) metabolism, in patients with PD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We compared prevalence of RLS, LMR and neuropathy in 37 PD patients and 37 age- and gender-matched controls. Correlations between RLS/LMR and neuropathy and symptomatic neuropathy, cumulative levodopa usage and vitamin B(12) levels were ascertained. RESULTS: RLS prevalence was comparable in PD patients and controls (16.2% vs 10.8%; P = 0.30). LMR was significantly more common in PD patients than in controls (40.5% vs 16.2%; P = 0.038), as was neuropathy (37.8% vs 8.1%; P = 0.005). Neither RLS, nor LMR correlated with neuropathy or symptomatic neuropathy, cumulative levodopa exposure or serum vitamin B(12) levels in patients with PD. There was a non-significant trend for a correlation between LMR and earlier age of onset of PD (P = 0.069). CONCLUSIONS: RLS and LMR appear unrelated to neuropathy or symptomatic neuropathy, cumulative levodopa usage, or serum vitamin B(12) levels in patients with PD. The occurrence of LMR may relate to the earlier onset of PD, raising the possibility of common pathophysiological mechanisms for PD and RLS, of which LMR may be an early manifestation in some patients. SN - 1600-0404 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22989006/No_association_between_neuropathy_and_restless_legs_in_Parkinson's_disease_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/ane.12011 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -