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Disaster exposure as a risk factor for mental health problems, eighteen months, four and ten years post-disaster--a longitudinal study.
BMC Psychiatry 2012; 12:147BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Disaster experiences have been associated with higher prevalence rates of (mental) health problems. The objective of this study was to examine the independent relation between a series of single disaster experiences versus the independent predictive value of a accumulation of disaster experiences, i.e. a sum score of experiences and symptoms of distress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

METHODS

Survivors of a fireworks disaster participated in a longitudinal study and completed a questionnaire three weeks (wave 1), eighteen months (wave 2) and four years post-disaster (wave 3). Ten years post-disaster (wave 4) the respondents consisted of native Dutch survivors only. Main outcome measures were general distress and symptoms of PTSD.

RESULTS

Degree of disaster exposure (sum score) and some disaster-related experiences (such as house destroyed, injured, confusion) were related to distress at waves 2 and 3. This relation was mediated by distress at an earlier point in time. None of the individual disaster-related experiences was independently related to symptoms of distress. The association between the degree of disaster exposure and symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3 was still statistically significant after controlling for symptoms of distress and PTSD at earlier point in time. The variable 'house destroyed' was the only factor that was independently related to symptoms of PTSD at wave 2. Ten years after the disaster, disaster exposure was mediated by symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3. Disaster exposure was not independently related to symptoms of PTSD ten years post-disaster.

CONCLUSIONS

Until 4 years after the disaster, degree of exposure (a sum score) was a risk factor for PTSD symptoms while none of the individual disaster experiences could be identified as an independent risk factor. Ten years post-disaster, disaster exposure was no longer an independent risk factor for symptoms of PTSD. Since symptoms of PTSD and distress at earlier waves perpetuate the symptoms at later waves, health care workers should aim their resources at those who still have symptoms after one and a half year post-disaster, to prevent health problems at medium and long-term.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Regioplan Policy Research, Nieuwezijds Voorburgwal 35, Amsterdam, RD, 1012, the Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22989093

Citation

van den Berg, Bellis, et al. "Disaster Exposure as a Risk Factor for Mental Health Problems, Eighteen Months, Four and Ten Years Post-disaster--a Longitudinal Study." BMC Psychiatry, vol. 12, 2012, p. 147.
van den Berg B, Wong A, van der Velden PG, et al. Disaster exposure as a risk factor for mental health problems, eighteen months, four and ten years post-disaster--a longitudinal study. BMC Psychiatry. 2012;12:147.
van den Berg, B., Wong, A., van der Velden, P. G., Boshuizen, H. C., & Grievink, L. (2012). Disaster exposure as a risk factor for mental health problems, eighteen months, four and ten years post-disaster--a longitudinal study. BMC Psychiatry, 12, p. 147. doi:10.1186/1471-244X-12-147.
van den Berg B, et al. Disaster Exposure as a Risk Factor for Mental Health Problems, Eighteen Months, Four and Ten Years Post-disaster--a Longitudinal Study. BMC Psychiatry. 2012 Sep 18;12:147. PubMed PMID: 22989093.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Disaster exposure as a risk factor for mental health problems, eighteen months, four and ten years post-disaster--a longitudinal study. AU - van den Berg,Bellis, AU - Wong,Albert, AU - van der Velden,Peter G, AU - Boshuizen,Hendriek C, AU - Grievink,Linda, Y1 - 2012/09/18/ PY - 2012/01/03/received PY - 2012/09/11/accepted PY - 2012/9/20/entrez PY - 2012/9/20/pubmed PY - 2013/10/30/medline SP - 147 EP - 147 JF - BMC psychiatry JO - BMC Psychiatry VL - 12 N2 - BACKGROUND: Disaster experiences have been associated with higher prevalence rates of (mental) health problems. The objective of this study was to examine the independent relation between a series of single disaster experiences versus the independent predictive value of a accumulation of disaster experiences, i.e. a sum score of experiences and symptoms of distress and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). METHODS: Survivors of a fireworks disaster participated in a longitudinal study and completed a questionnaire three weeks (wave 1), eighteen months (wave 2) and four years post-disaster (wave 3). Ten years post-disaster (wave 4) the respondents consisted of native Dutch survivors only. Main outcome measures were general distress and symptoms of PTSD. RESULTS: Degree of disaster exposure (sum score) and some disaster-related experiences (such as house destroyed, injured, confusion) were related to distress at waves 2 and 3. This relation was mediated by distress at an earlier point in time. None of the individual disaster-related experiences was independently related to symptoms of distress. The association between the degree of disaster exposure and symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3 was still statistically significant after controlling for symptoms of distress and PTSD at earlier point in time. The variable 'house destroyed' was the only factor that was independently related to symptoms of PTSD at wave 2. Ten years after the disaster, disaster exposure was mediated by symptoms of PTSD at waves 2 and 3. Disaster exposure was not independently related to symptoms of PTSD ten years post-disaster. CONCLUSIONS: Until 4 years after the disaster, degree of exposure (a sum score) was a risk factor for PTSD symptoms while none of the individual disaster experiences could be identified as an independent risk factor. Ten years post-disaster, disaster exposure was no longer an independent risk factor for symptoms of PTSD. Since symptoms of PTSD and distress at earlier waves perpetuate the symptoms at later waves, health care workers should aim their resources at those who still have symptoms after one and a half year post-disaster, to prevent health problems at medium and long-term. SN - 1471-244X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22989093/Disaster_exposure_as_a_risk_factor_for_mental_health_problems_eighteen_months_four_and_ten_years_post_disaster__a_longitudinal_study_ L2 - https://bmcpsychiatry.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-244X-12-147 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -