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Adherence with electronic monitoring and symptoms in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.
Psychiatry Investig. 2012 Sep; 9(3):263-8.PI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The primary aim of this study was to compare electronic monitoring with other measures of adherence to Osmotic-controlled Release Oral delivery System methylphenidate in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The secondary aim was to analyze the relationships between adherence and clinical factors, including ADHD symptoms.

METHODS

Thirty-nine children diagnosed with ADHD were monitored for adherence to medication over the course of eight weeks. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), which is a bottle cap with a microprocessor that records all instances and times that the bottle is opened; patient self-report; clinician rating; and pill count. Information, including demographic and clinical characteristics, symptom rating scale, and psychological test results, were also collected. The relationships between adherence and clinical factors, including ADHD rating scores of baseline and of the changes, were assessed.

RESULTS

The rate of non-adherence measured by the MEMS was found to be 46.2%, which was considerably higher than those of the patient self-report (17.9%), clinician rating (31.7%), and pill count (12.8%) of non-adherence. The rate of adherence measured by the MEMS was not significantly associated with baseline symptom severity or symptom changes over the eight weeks, although non-adherent group showed more severe baseline symptoms and inferior improvement.

CONCLUSION

Adherence as measured by the MEMS showed a discrepancy with other measures of adherence in patients with ADHD. The symptom severity and level of improvement were not related to adherence with MEMS. Further studies are needed to evaluate the variables that may impact medication adherence in children with ADHD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan Hospital, Ansan, Republic of Korea. ; Korea University Research Institute of Mental Health, Seoul, Republic of Korea.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

22993526

Citation

Yang, Jaewon, et al. "Adherence With Electronic Monitoring and Symptoms in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder." Psychiatry Investigation, vol. 9, no. 3, 2012, pp. 263-8.
Yang J, Yoon BM, Lee MS, et al. Adherence with electronic monitoring and symptoms in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Psychiatry investigation. 2012;9(3):263-8.
Yang, J., Yoon, B. M., Lee, M. S., Joe, S. H., Jung, I. K., & Kim, S. H. (2012). Adherence with electronic monitoring and symptoms in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Psychiatry Investigation, 9(3), 263-8.
Yang J, et al. Adherence With Electronic Monitoring and Symptoms in Children With Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. Psychiatry investigation. 2012;9(3):263-8. PubMed PMID: 22993526.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Adherence with electronic monitoring and symptoms in children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. AU - Yang,Jaewon, AU - Yoon,Byung-Moon, AU - Lee,Moon-Soo, AU - Joe,Sook-Haeng, AU - Jung,In-Kwa, AU - Kim,Seung-Hyun, Y1 - 2012/09/06/ PY - 2011/05/25/received PY - 2011/12/21/revised PY - 2012/03/25/accepted PY - 2012/9/21/entrez PY - 2012/9/21/pubmed PY - 2012/9/21/medline KW - Adherence KW - Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder KW - Medication Event Monitoring System KW - Symptoms SP - 263 EP - 8 JF - Psychiatry investigation VL - 9 IS - 3 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to compare electronic monitoring with other measures of adherence to Osmotic-controlled Release Oral delivery System methylphenidate in children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). The secondary aim was to analyze the relationships between adherence and clinical factors, including ADHD symptoms. METHODS: Thirty-nine children diagnosed with ADHD were monitored for adherence to medication over the course of eight weeks. Medication adherence was assessed using the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS), which is a bottle cap with a microprocessor that records all instances and times that the bottle is opened; patient self-report; clinician rating; and pill count. Information, including demographic and clinical characteristics, symptom rating scale, and psychological test results, were also collected. The relationships between adherence and clinical factors, including ADHD rating scores of baseline and of the changes, were assessed. RESULTS: The rate of non-adherence measured by the MEMS was found to be 46.2%, which was considerably higher than those of the patient self-report (17.9%), clinician rating (31.7%), and pill count (12.8%) of non-adherence. The rate of adherence measured by the MEMS was not significantly associated with baseline symptom severity or symptom changes over the eight weeks, although non-adherent group showed more severe baseline symptoms and inferior improvement. CONCLUSION: Adherence as measured by the MEMS showed a discrepancy with other measures of adherence in patients with ADHD. The symptom severity and level of improvement were not related to adherence with MEMS. Further studies are needed to evaluate the variables that may impact medication adherence in children with ADHD. SN - 1976-3026 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/22993526/Adherence_with_electronic_monitoring_and_symptoms_in_children_with_attention_deficit_hyperactivity_disorder_ L2 - http://psychiatryinvestigation.org/journal/view.php?doi=10.4306/pi.2012.9.3.263 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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