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The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on respiratory illness in infants and children.
Curr Allergy Asthma Rep 2012; 12(6):564-73CA

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), especially omega-3 LCPUFA, improves respiratory health early in life. This review summarizes publications from 2009 through July 2012 that evaluated effects of fish, fish oil or LCPUFA intake during pregnancy, lactation, and early postnatal years on allergic and infectious respiratory illnesses. Studies during pregnancy found inconsistent effects in offspring: two showed no effects and three showed protective effects of omega-3 LCPUFA on respiratory illnesses or atopic dermatitis. Two studies found that infants fed breast milk with higher omega-3 LCPUFA had reduced allergic manifestations. Earlier introduction of fish improved respiratory health or reduced allergy in four studies. Three randomized controlled trials showed that providing LCPUFA during infancy or childhood reduced allergy and/or respiratory illness while one found no effect. Potential explanations for the variability among studies and possible mechanisms of action for LCPUFA in allergy and respiratory disease are discussed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Human Nutrition Department, Wageningen University, Bornse Weilanden 9, 6708 WG, Wageningen, the Netherlands. jeske.hageman@gmail.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23001718

Citation

Hageman, Jeske H J., et al. "The Impact of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids On Respiratory Illness in Infants and Children." Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, vol. 12, no. 6, 2012, pp. 564-73.
Hageman JH, Hooyenga P, Diersen-Schade DA, et al. The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on respiratory illness in infants and children. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2012;12(6):564-73.
Hageman, J. H., Hooyenga, P., Diersen-Schade, D. A., Scalabrin, D. M., Wichers, H. J., & Birch, E. E. (2012). The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on respiratory illness in infants and children. Current Allergy and Asthma Reports, 12(6), pp. 564-73. doi:10.1007/s11882-012-0304-1.
Hageman JH, et al. The Impact of Dietary Long-chain Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids On Respiratory Illness in Infants and Children. Curr Allergy Asthma Rep. 2012;12(6):564-73. PubMed PMID: 23001718.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on respiratory illness in infants and children. AU - Hageman,Jeske H J, AU - Hooyenga,Pieter, AU - Diersen-Schade,Deborah A, AU - Scalabrin,Deolinda M Felin, AU - Wichers,Harry J, AU - Birch,Eileen E, PY - 2012/9/25/entrez PY - 2012/9/25/pubmed PY - 2013/4/11/medline SP - 564 EP - 73 JF - Current allergy and asthma reports JO - Curr Allergy Asthma Rep VL - 12 IS - 6 N2 - Increasing evidence suggests that intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA), especially omega-3 LCPUFA, improves respiratory health early in life. This review summarizes publications from 2009 through July 2012 that evaluated effects of fish, fish oil or LCPUFA intake during pregnancy, lactation, and early postnatal years on allergic and infectious respiratory illnesses. Studies during pregnancy found inconsistent effects in offspring: two showed no effects and three showed protective effects of omega-3 LCPUFA on respiratory illnesses or atopic dermatitis. Two studies found that infants fed breast milk with higher omega-3 LCPUFA had reduced allergic manifestations. Earlier introduction of fish improved respiratory health or reduced allergy in four studies. Three randomized controlled trials showed that providing LCPUFA during infancy or childhood reduced allergy and/or respiratory illness while one found no effect. Potential explanations for the variability among studies and possible mechanisms of action for LCPUFA in allergy and respiratory disease are discussed. SN - 1534-6315 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23001718/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11882-012-0304-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -