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Factors impacting the departure rates of female and male junior medical school faculty: evidence from a longitudinal analysis.
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012 Oct; 21(10):1059-65.JW

Abstract

BACKGROUND

High rates of attrition have been documented nationally in assistant professor faculty of U.S. medical schools. Our objective was to investigate the association of individual level risk factors, track of academic appointment, and use of institutional leave policies with departure in junior faculty of a research-intensive school of medicine.

METHODS

Participants included 901 faculty newly hired as assistant professors from July 1, 1999, through December 30, 2007, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The faculty affairs database was used to determine demographics, hiring date, track of appointment, track changes, time to departure, and use of work-life policies for an extension of the probationary period for mandatory review, reduction in duties, and leave of absence.

RESULTS

Over one quarter (26.7%) of faculty departed during follow-up. Faculty appointed on the clinician educator or research tracks were at increased risk of departure compared to the tenure track (hazard ratio [HR] 1.87, confidence interval, [CI] 1.28-2.71; HR 4.50, CI 2.91-6.96; respectively). Women appointed on the clinician educator track were at increased risk of departure compared to men (HR 1.46, CI 1.04-2.05). Faculty who took an extension of the probationary period were at decreased risk of departure (HR 0.36, CI 0.25-0.52).

CONCLUSIONS

At this institution, junior faculty on the tenure track were least likely to depart before their mandatory review compared to faculty on the clinician educator or research tracks. Female assistant professors on the clinician educator track are of significant risk for departure. Taking advantage of the work-life policy for an extension of the probationary period protects against attrition.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23004025

Citation

Speck, Rebecca M., et al. "Factors Impacting the Departure Rates of Female and Male Junior Medical School Faculty: Evidence From a Longitudinal Analysis." Journal of Women's Health (2002), vol. 21, no. 10, 2012, pp. 1059-65.
Speck RM, Sammel MD, Troxel AB, et al. Factors impacting the departure rates of female and male junior medical school faculty: evidence from a longitudinal analysis. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012;21(10):1059-65.
Speck, R. M., Sammel, M. D., Troxel, A. B., Cappola, A. R., Williams-Smith, C. T., Chittams, J., Scott, P., Tuton, L. W., & Abbuhl, S. B. (2012). Factors impacting the departure rates of female and male junior medical school faculty: evidence from a longitudinal analysis. Journal of Women's Health (2002), 21(10), 1059-65. https://doi.org/10.1089/jwh.2011.3394
Speck RM, et al. Factors Impacting the Departure Rates of Female and Male Junior Medical School Faculty: Evidence From a Longitudinal Analysis. J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012;21(10):1059-65. PubMed PMID: 23004025.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Factors impacting the departure rates of female and male junior medical school faculty: evidence from a longitudinal analysis. AU - Speck,Rebecca M, AU - Sammel,Mary D, AU - Troxel,Andrea B, AU - Cappola,Anne R, AU - Williams-Smith,Catherine T, AU - Chittams,Jesse, AU - Scott,Patricia, AU - Tuton,Lucy Wolf, AU - Abbuhl,Stephanie B, Y1 - 2012/09/24/ PY - 2012/9/26/entrez PY - 2012/9/26/pubmed PY - 2012/12/13/medline SP - 1059 EP - 65 JF - Journal of women's health (2002) JO - J Womens Health (Larchmt) VL - 21 IS - 10 N2 - BACKGROUND: High rates of attrition have been documented nationally in assistant professor faculty of U.S. medical schools. Our objective was to investigate the association of individual level risk factors, track of academic appointment, and use of institutional leave policies with departure in junior faculty of a research-intensive school of medicine. METHODS: Participants included 901 faculty newly hired as assistant professors from July 1, 1999, through December 30, 2007, at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The faculty affairs database was used to determine demographics, hiring date, track of appointment, track changes, time to departure, and use of work-life policies for an extension of the probationary period for mandatory review, reduction in duties, and leave of absence. RESULTS: Over one quarter (26.7%) of faculty departed during follow-up. Faculty appointed on the clinician educator or research tracks were at increased risk of departure compared to the tenure track (hazard ratio [HR] 1.87, confidence interval, [CI] 1.28-2.71; HR 4.50, CI 2.91-6.96; respectively). Women appointed on the clinician educator track were at increased risk of departure compared to men (HR 1.46, CI 1.04-2.05). Faculty who took an extension of the probationary period were at decreased risk of departure (HR 0.36, CI 0.25-0.52). CONCLUSIONS: At this institution, junior faculty on the tenure track were least likely to depart before their mandatory review compared to faculty on the clinician educator or research tracks. Female assistant professors on the clinician educator track are of significant risk for departure. Taking advantage of the work-life policy for an extension of the probationary period protects against attrition. SN - 1931-843X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23004025/Factors_impacting_the_departure_rates_of_female_and_male_junior_medical_school_faculty:_evidence_from_a_longitudinal_analysis_ L2 - https://www.liebertpub.com/doi/full/10.1089/jwh.2011.3394?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -