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Intimate partner violence and HIV risk factors among African-American and African-Caribbean women in clinic-based settings.
AIDS Care. 2013; 25(4):472-80.AC

Abstract

Despite progress against intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV/AIDS in the past two decades, both epidemics remain major public health problems, particularly among women of color. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between recent IPV and HIV risk factors (sexual and drug risk behaviors, sexually transmitted infections [STIs], condom use, and negotiation) among women of African descent. We conducted a comparative case-control study in women's health clinics in Baltimore, MD, USA and St. Thomas and St. Croix, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Women aged 18-55 years who experienced physical and/or sexual IPV in the past two years (Baltimore, n=107; USVI, n=235) were compared to women who never experienced any form of abuse (Baltimore, n=207; USVI, n=119). Logistic regression identified correlates of recent IPV by site. In both sites, having a partner with concurrent sex partners was independently associated with a history of recent IPV (Baltimore, AOR: 3.91, 95% CI: 1.79-8.55 and USVI, AOR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.11-4.56). In Baltimore, factors independently associated with recent IPV were lifetime casual sex partners (AOR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.11-3.57), exchange sex partners (AOR: 5.26, 95% CI: 1.92-14.42), infrequent condom use during vaginal sex (AOR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.08-0.72), and infrequent condom use during anal sex (AOR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.09-0.93). In contrast, in the USVI, having a concurrent sex partner (AOR: 3.33, 95% CI: 1.46-7.60), frequent condom use during vaginal sex (AOR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.06-3.65), frequent condom use during anal sex (AOR: 6.29, 95% CI: 1.57-25.23), drug use (AOR: 3.16, 95% CI: 1.00-10.06), and a past-year STI (AOR: 2.68, 95% CI: 1.25-5.72) were associated with recent IPV history. The divergent results by site warrant further investigation into the potential influence of culture, norms, and intentions on the relationships examined. Nonetheless, study findings support a critical need to continue the development and implementation of culturally tailored screening for IPV within HIV prevention and treatment programs.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Global Public Health, Department of Medicine, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA. jstockman@ucsd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23006050

Citation

Stockman, Jamila K., et al. "Intimate Partner Violence and HIV Risk Factors Among African-American and African-Caribbean Women in Clinic-based Settings." AIDS Care, vol. 25, no. 4, 2013, pp. 472-80.
Stockman JK, Lucea MB, Draughon JE, et al. Intimate partner violence and HIV risk factors among African-American and African-Caribbean women in clinic-based settings. AIDS Care. 2013;25(4):472-80.
Stockman, J. K., Lucea, M. B., Draughon, J. E., Sabri, B., Anderson, J. C., Bertrand, D., Campbell, D. W., Callwood, G. B., & Campbell, J. C. (2013). Intimate partner violence and HIV risk factors among African-American and African-Caribbean women in clinic-based settings. AIDS Care, 25(4), 472-80. https://doi.org/10.1080/09540121.2012.722602
Stockman JK, et al. Intimate Partner Violence and HIV Risk Factors Among African-American and African-Caribbean Women in Clinic-based Settings. AIDS Care. 2013;25(4):472-80. PubMed PMID: 23006050.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intimate partner violence and HIV risk factors among African-American and African-Caribbean women in clinic-based settings. AU - Stockman,Jamila K, AU - Lucea,Marguerite B, AU - Draughon,Jessica E, AU - Sabri,Bushra, AU - Anderson,Jocelyn C, AU - Bertrand,Desiree, AU - Campbell,Doris W, AU - Callwood,Gloria B, AU - Campbell,Jacquelyn C, Y1 - 2012/09/25/ PY - 2012/9/26/entrez PY - 2012/9/26/pubmed PY - 2013/9/27/medline SP - 472 EP - 80 JF - AIDS care JO - AIDS Care VL - 25 IS - 4 N2 - Despite progress against intimate partner violence (IPV) and HIV/AIDS in the past two decades, both epidemics remain major public health problems, particularly among women of color. The objective of this study was to assess the relationship between recent IPV and HIV risk factors (sexual and drug risk behaviors, sexually transmitted infections [STIs], condom use, and negotiation) among women of African descent. We conducted a comparative case-control study in women's health clinics in Baltimore, MD, USA and St. Thomas and St. Croix, US Virgin Islands (USVI). Women aged 18-55 years who experienced physical and/or sexual IPV in the past two years (Baltimore, n=107; USVI, n=235) were compared to women who never experienced any form of abuse (Baltimore, n=207; USVI, n=119). Logistic regression identified correlates of recent IPV by site. In both sites, having a partner with concurrent sex partners was independently associated with a history of recent IPV (Baltimore, AOR: 3.91, 95% CI: 1.79-8.55 and USVI, AOR: 2.25, 95% CI: 1.11-4.56). In Baltimore, factors independently associated with recent IPV were lifetime casual sex partners (AOR: 1.99, 95% CI: 1.11-3.57), exchange sex partners (AOR: 5.26, 95% CI: 1.92-14.42), infrequent condom use during vaginal sex (AOR: 0.24, 95% CI: 0.08-0.72), and infrequent condom use during anal sex (AOR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.09-0.93). In contrast, in the USVI, having a concurrent sex partner (AOR: 3.33, 95% CI: 1.46-7.60), frequent condom use during vaginal sex (AOR: 1.97, 95% CI: 1.06-3.65), frequent condom use during anal sex (AOR: 6.29, 95% CI: 1.57-25.23), drug use (AOR: 3.16, 95% CI: 1.00-10.06), and a past-year STI (AOR: 2.68, 95% CI: 1.25-5.72) were associated with recent IPV history. The divergent results by site warrant further investigation into the potential influence of culture, norms, and intentions on the relationships examined. Nonetheless, study findings support a critical need to continue the development and implementation of culturally tailored screening for IPV within HIV prevention and treatment programs. SN - 1360-0451 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23006050/Intimate_partner_violence_and_HIV_risk_factors_among_African_American_and_African_Caribbean_women_in_clinic_based_settings_ L2 - https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09540121.2012.722602 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -