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The conserved dopaminergic diencephalospinal tract mediates vertebrate locomotor development in zebrafish larvae.
J Neurosci. 2012 Sep 26; 32(39):13488-500.JN

Abstract

The most conserved part of the vertebrate dopaminergic system is the orthopedia (otp)-expressing diencephalic neuronal population that constitutes the dopaminergic diencephalospinal tract (DDT). Although studies in the neonatal murine spinal cord in vitro suggest an early locomotor role of the DDT, the function of the DDT in developing vertebrates in vivo remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the DDT in the locomotor development of zebrafish larvae. To assess the development of the behavioral and neural locomotor pattern, we used high-throughput video tracking in combination with peripheral nerve recordings. We found a behavioral and neural correspondence in the developmental switch from an immature to mature locomotor pattern. Blocking endogenous dopamine receptor 4 (D(4)R) signaling in vivo either before or after the developmental switch prevented or reversed the switch, respectively. Spinal transections of post-switch larvae reestablished the immature locomotor pattern, which was rescued to a mature-like pattern via spinal D(4)R agonism. Selective chemogenetic ablation of otp b (otpb) neurons that contribute to the DDT perpetuated the immature locomotor pattern in vivo. This phenotype was recapitulated by diencephalic transections that removed the dopaminergic otpb population and was rescued to a mature-like locomotor pattern by D(4)R agonism. We conclude that the dopaminergic otpb population, via the DDT, is responsible for spinal D(4)R signaling to mediate the developmental switch to the mature locomotor pattern of zebrafish. These results, integrated with the mammalian literature, suggest that the DDT represents an evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory system that is necessary for normal vertebrate locomotor development.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23015438

Citation

Lambert, Aaron M., et al. "The Conserved Dopaminergic Diencephalospinal Tract Mediates Vertebrate Locomotor Development in Zebrafish Larvae." The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, vol. 32, no. 39, 2012, pp. 13488-500.
Lambert AM, Bonkowsky JL, Masino MA. The conserved dopaminergic diencephalospinal tract mediates vertebrate locomotor development in zebrafish larvae. J Neurosci. 2012;32(39):13488-500.
Lambert, A. M., Bonkowsky, J. L., & Masino, M. A. (2012). The conserved dopaminergic diencephalospinal tract mediates vertebrate locomotor development in zebrafish larvae. The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience, 32(39), 13488-500.
Lambert AM, Bonkowsky JL, Masino MA. The Conserved Dopaminergic Diencephalospinal Tract Mediates Vertebrate Locomotor Development in Zebrafish Larvae. J Neurosci. 2012 Sep 26;32(39):13488-500. PubMed PMID: 23015438.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The conserved dopaminergic diencephalospinal tract mediates vertebrate locomotor development in zebrafish larvae. AU - Lambert,Aaron M, AU - Bonkowsky,Joshua L, AU - Masino,Mark A, PY - 2012/9/28/entrez PY - 2012/9/28/pubmed PY - 2012/12/12/medline SP - 13488 EP - 500 JF - The Journal of neuroscience : the official journal of the Society for Neuroscience JO - J. Neurosci. VL - 32 IS - 39 N2 - The most conserved part of the vertebrate dopaminergic system is the orthopedia (otp)-expressing diencephalic neuronal population that constitutes the dopaminergic diencephalospinal tract (DDT). Although studies in the neonatal murine spinal cord in vitro suggest an early locomotor role of the DDT, the function of the DDT in developing vertebrates in vivo remains unknown. Here, we investigated the role of the DDT in the locomotor development of zebrafish larvae. To assess the development of the behavioral and neural locomotor pattern, we used high-throughput video tracking in combination with peripheral nerve recordings. We found a behavioral and neural correspondence in the developmental switch from an immature to mature locomotor pattern. Blocking endogenous dopamine receptor 4 (D(4)R) signaling in vivo either before or after the developmental switch prevented or reversed the switch, respectively. Spinal transections of post-switch larvae reestablished the immature locomotor pattern, which was rescued to a mature-like pattern via spinal D(4)R agonism. Selective chemogenetic ablation of otp b (otpb) neurons that contribute to the DDT perpetuated the immature locomotor pattern in vivo. This phenotype was recapitulated by diencephalic transections that removed the dopaminergic otpb population and was rescued to a mature-like locomotor pattern by D(4)R agonism. We conclude that the dopaminergic otpb population, via the DDT, is responsible for spinal D(4)R signaling to mediate the developmental switch to the mature locomotor pattern of zebrafish. These results, integrated with the mammalian literature, suggest that the DDT represents an evolutionarily conserved neuromodulatory system that is necessary for normal vertebrate locomotor development. SN - 1529-2401 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23015438/The_conserved_dopaminergic_diencephalospinal_tract_mediates_vertebrate_locomotor_development_in_zebrafish_larvae_ L2 - http://www.jneurosci.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=23015438 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -