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Epidemiology of foodborne norovirus outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008.
Emerg Infect Dis. 2012 Oct; 18(10):1566-73.EI

Abstract

Noroviruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness in the United States. To better guide interventions, we analyzed 2,922 foodborne disease outbreaks for which norovirus was the suspected or confirmed cause, which had been reported to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during 2001-2008. On average, 365 foodborne norovirus outbreaks were reported annually, resulting in an estimated 10,324 illnesses, 1,247 health care provider visits, 156 hospitalizations, and 1 death. In 364 outbreaks attributed to a single commodity, leafy vegetables (33%), fruits/nuts (16%), and mollusks (13%) were implicated most commonly. Infected food handlers were the source of 53% of outbreaks and may have contributed to 82% of outbreaks. Most foods were likely contaminated during preparation and service, except for mollusks, and occasionally, produce was contaminated during production and processing. Interventions to reduce the frequency of foodborne norovirus outbreaks should focus on food workers and production of produce and shellfish.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia 30333, USA. ajhall@cdc.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23017158

Citation

Hall, Aron J., et al. "Epidemiology of Foodborne Norovirus Outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008." Emerging Infectious Diseases, vol. 18, no. 10, 2012, pp. 1566-73.
Hall AJ, Eisenbart VG, Etingüe AL, et al. Epidemiology of foodborne norovirus outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008. Emerging Infect Dis. 2012;18(10):1566-73.
Hall, A. J., Eisenbart, V. G., Etingüe, A. L., Gould, L. H., Lopman, B. A., & Parashar, U. D. (2012). Epidemiology of foodborne norovirus outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008. Emerging Infectious Diseases, 18(10), 1566-73. https://doi.org/10.3201/eid1810.120833
Hall AJ, et al. Epidemiology of Foodborne Norovirus Outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008. Emerging Infect Dis. 2012;18(10):1566-73. PubMed PMID: 23017158.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Epidemiology of foodborne norovirus outbreaks, United States, 2001-2008. AU - Hall,Aron J, AU - Eisenbart,Valerie G, AU - Etingüe,Amy Lehman, AU - Gould,L Hannah, AU - Lopman,Ben A, AU - Parashar,Umesh D, PY - 2012/9/29/entrez PY - 2012/9/29/pubmed PY - 2013/2/21/medline SP - 1566 EP - 73 JF - Emerging infectious diseases JO - Emerging Infect. Dis. VL - 18 IS - 10 N2 - Noroviruses are the leading cause of foodborne illness in the United States. To better guide interventions, we analyzed 2,922 foodborne disease outbreaks for which norovirus was the suspected or confirmed cause, which had been reported to the Foodborne Disease Outbreak Surveillance System of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention during 2001-2008. On average, 365 foodborne norovirus outbreaks were reported annually, resulting in an estimated 10,324 illnesses, 1,247 health care provider visits, 156 hospitalizations, and 1 death. In 364 outbreaks attributed to a single commodity, leafy vegetables (33%), fruits/nuts (16%), and mollusks (13%) were implicated most commonly. Infected food handlers were the source of 53% of outbreaks and may have contributed to 82% of outbreaks. Most foods were likely contaminated during preparation and service, except for mollusks, and occasionally, produce was contaminated during production and processing. Interventions to reduce the frequency of foodborne norovirus outbreaks should focus on food workers and production of produce and shellfish. SN - 1080-6059 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23017158/full_citation L2 - https://dx.doi.org/10.3201/eid1810.120833 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -