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Advance care planning and interpersonal relationships: a two-way street.
Fam Pract. 2013 Apr; 30(2):219-26.FP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Advance care planning (ACP) has been gaining prominence for its perceived benefits for patients in enhancing patient autonomy and ensuring high-quality end-of-life-care. Moreover, it has been postulated that ACP has positive effects on families and health professionals and their relationship with the patient. However, there is a paucity of studies examining the views of GPs on this issue.

OBJECTIVE

To explore GP views on the impact that ACP has on interpersonal relationships among those involved in the patient's care.

METHOD

Semi-structured, open-ended interviews of a purposive sample of 17 GPs. Interview transcripts were analysed using constructionist grounded theory methodology with QSR NVivo 9 software.

RESULTS

ACP was seen as having both positive and negative impacts on interpersonal relationships. It was thought to enhance family relationships, help resolve conflicts between families and health professionals and improve trust and understanding between patients and health professionals. Negatively, it could take the family's attention away from patient care. The link between ACP and interpersonal relationships was perceived to be bidirectional-the nature of interpersonal relationship that patients have with their families and health professionals has a profound impact on what form of ACP is likely to be useful.

CONCLUSION

Our study highlights the importance that GPs place on the link between ACP and the patient's interpersonal context. This has implications on how ACP is conducted in primary care settings that are considerably different from other care settings in their emphasis on continuity of care and long-term nature of relationships.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Public Health and Community Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. j.rhee@unsw.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23028000

Citation

Rhee, Joel J., et al. "Advance Care Planning and Interpersonal Relationships: a Two-way Street." Family Practice, vol. 30, no. 2, 2013, pp. 219-26.
Rhee JJ, Zwar NA, Kemp LA. Advance care planning and interpersonal relationships: a two-way street. Fam Pract. 2013;30(2):219-26.
Rhee, J. J., Zwar, N. A., & Kemp, L. A. (2013). Advance care planning and interpersonal relationships: a two-way street. Family Practice, 30(2), 219-26. https://doi.org/10.1093/fampra/cms063
Rhee JJ, Zwar NA, Kemp LA. Advance Care Planning and Interpersonal Relationships: a Two-way Street. Fam Pract. 2013;30(2):219-26. PubMed PMID: 23028000.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Advance care planning and interpersonal relationships: a two-way street. AU - Rhee,Joel J, AU - Zwar,Nicholas A, AU - Kemp,Lynn A, Y1 - 2012/10/01/ PY - 2012/10/3/entrez PY - 2012/10/3/pubmed PY - 2013/9/13/medline SP - 219 EP - 26 JF - Family practice JO - Fam Pract VL - 30 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Advance care planning (ACP) has been gaining prominence for its perceived benefits for patients in enhancing patient autonomy and ensuring high-quality end-of-life-care. Moreover, it has been postulated that ACP has positive effects on families and health professionals and their relationship with the patient. However, there is a paucity of studies examining the views of GPs on this issue. OBJECTIVE: To explore GP views on the impact that ACP has on interpersonal relationships among those involved in the patient's care. METHOD: Semi-structured, open-ended interviews of a purposive sample of 17 GPs. Interview transcripts were analysed using constructionist grounded theory methodology with QSR NVivo 9 software. RESULTS: ACP was seen as having both positive and negative impacts on interpersonal relationships. It was thought to enhance family relationships, help resolve conflicts between families and health professionals and improve trust and understanding between patients and health professionals. Negatively, it could take the family's attention away from patient care. The link between ACP and interpersonal relationships was perceived to be bidirectional-the nature of interpersonal relationship that patients have with their families and health professionals has a profound impact on what form of ACP is likely to be useful. CONCLUSION: Our study highlights the importance that GPs place on the link between ACP and the patient's interpersonal context. This has implications on how ACP is conducted in primary care settings that are considerably different from other care settings in their emphasis on continuity of care and long-term nature of relationships. SN - 1460-2229 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23028000/Advance_care_planning_and_interpersonal_relationships:_a_two_way_street_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/fampra/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/fampra/cms063 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -