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The quality of mental health care for veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom.
Med Care. 2013 Jan; 51(1):84-9.MC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Some Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans experience serious mental health (MH) problems. As OEF/OIF soldiers leave active military duty, their growing numbers pose a challenge to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in delivering high-quality mental health/substance-use disorder (MH/SUD) care.

OBJECTIVE

To determine whether the quality of MH/SUD care provided by the VA differs by OEF/OIF veteran status.

METHODS

Veterans with selected MH/SUDs were identified from administrative records using diagnostic codes. OEF/OIF service was determined based on Defense Manpower Data Center separation files. Eleven processes of care and 7 utilization performance indicators were examined. Regression analyses were adjusted for veteran demographic and clinical characteristics to test for differences in care by OEF/OIF status.

RESULTS

Of the 836,699 veterans with selected diagnoses who received MH/SUD treatment in FY2007, 52,870 (6.3%) were OEF/OIF veterans. In unadjusted analyses, OEF/OIF veterans were more likely to receive evidence-based care processes captured by 6 of the 11 dichotomous performance indicators examined; however, among those receiving psychotherapy encounters, OEF/OIF veterans received significantly fewer visits (6.9 vs. 9.7, P<0.0001). In adjusted analyses, only postdischarge follow-up remained meaningfully higher for OEF/OIF veterans.

CONCLUSIONS

Efforts to maintain and/or increase OEF/OIF veteran participation in VA MH/SUD services should be informed by their characteristics, such as younger age and better physical health relative to other veterans.

Authors+Show Affiliations

RAND Corporation, Santa Monica, CA 90407, USA. paddock@rand.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23032356

Citation

Paddock, Susan M., et al. "The Quality of Mental Health Care for Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom." Medical Care, vol. 51, no. 1, 2013, pp. 84-9.
Paddock SM, Woodroffe A, Watkins KE, et al. The quality of mental health care for veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. Med Care. 2013;51(1):84-9.
Paddock, S. M., Woodroffe, A., Watkins, K. E., Sorbero, M. E., Smith, B., Mannle, T. E., Solomon, J., & Pincus, H. A. (2013). The quality of mental health care for veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. Medical Care, 51(1), 84-9. https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0b013e318270bb6c
Paddock SM, et al. The Quality of Mental Health Care for Veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. Med Care. 2013;51(1):84-9. PubMed PMID: 23032356.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The quality of mental health care for veterans of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom. AU - Paddock,Susan M, AU - Woodroffe,Abigail, AU - Watkins,Katherine E, AU - Sorbero,Melony E, AU - Smith,Brad, AU - Mannle,Thomas E,Jr AU - Solomon,Jacob, AU - Pincus,Harold A, PY - 2012/10/4/entrez PY - 2012/10/4/pubmed PY - 2013/2/21/medline SP - 84 EP - 9 JF - Medical care JO - Med Care VL - 51 IS - 1 N2 - BACKGROUND: Some Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) veterans experience serious mental health (MH) problems. As OEF/OIF soldiers leave active military duty, their growing numbers pose a challenge to the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) in delivering high-quality mental health/substance-use disorder (MH/SUD) care. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the quality of MH/SUD care provided by the VA differs by OEF/OIF veteran status. METHODS: Veterans with selected MH/SUDs were identified from administrative records using diagnostic codes. OEF/OIF service was determined based on Defense Manpower Data Center separation files. Eleven processes of care and 7 utilization performance indicators were examined. Regression analyses were adjusted for veteran demographic and clinical characteristics to test for differences in care by OEF/OIF status. RESULTS: Of the 836,699 veterans with selected diagnoses who received MH/SUD treatment in FY2007, 52,870 (6.3%) were OEF/OIF veterans. In unadjusted analyses, OEF/OIF veterans were more likely to receive evidence-based care processes captured by 6 of the 11 dichotomous performance indicators examined; however, among those receiving psychotherapy encounters, OEF/OIF veterans received significantly fewer visits (6.9 vs. 9.7, P<0.0001). In adjusted analyses, only postdischarge follow-up remained meaningfully higher for OEF/OIF veterans. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to maintain and/or increase OEF/OIF veteran participation in VA MH/SUD services should be informed by their characteristics, such as younger age and better physical health relative to other veterans. SN - 1537-1948 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23032356/The_quality_of_mental_health_care_for_veterans_of_Operation_Enduring_Freedom/Operation_Iraqi_Freedom_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/MLR.0b013e318270bb6c DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -