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Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women.

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that black tea polyphenols contribute to vascular health. We have recently shown that regular ingestion of polyphenol-rich black tea over 6 months results in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, the time course of these effects remains unclear. Therefore, our objective was to determine if short-term effects of tea on blood pressure could contribute to longer-term benefits of regular tea consumption on blood pressure. Men and women (n = 111) were recruited to a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind parallel designed trial. During a 4-week run-in, all participants consumed 3 cups per day of black tea. Participants then consumed 3 cups over 1 day of either powdered black tea solids containing 429 mg of polyphenols (tea), or a control product matched in flavour and caffeine content but containing no tea solids. The 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate was measured at the end of the 4-week run-in (baseline) and again during the 24 h intervention period. The 24 h day-time and night-time blood pressures were not significantly different between tea and control (P > 0.05). Baseline-adjusted net effects on mean 24 h ambulatory blood pressure for systolic and diastolic blood pressure were -0.2 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.5 to 1.0), P = 0.72, and 0.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.0 to 0.9), P = 0.95, respectively. Heart rate was significantly lower for tea compared to control during the night-time and early-morning periods (-2.0 (95% CI, -3.2, -0.8) bpm, and -1.9 (95% CI, -3.7, -0.2) bpm, respectively; P < 0.05 for both), but not during the day-time. These results suggest that the longer-term benefits of black tea on blood pressure are unlikely to be due to short-term changes.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, GPO Box X2213, Perth, Western Australia 6847, Australia. Jonathan.Hodgson@uwa.edu.au

    , , , ,

    Source

    Food & function 4:1 2013 Jan pg 111-5

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Blood Pressure
    Female
    Humans
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Polyphenols
    Tea

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    23038021

    Citation

    Hodgson, Jonathan M., et al. "Short-term Effects of Polyphenol-rich Black Tea On Blood Pressure in Men and Women." Food & Function, vol. 4, no. 1, 2013, pp. 111-5.
    Hodgson JM, Woodman RJ, Puddey IB, et al. Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women. Food Funct. 2013;4(1):111-5.
    Hodgson, J. M., Woodman, R. J., Puddey, I. B., Mulder, T., Fuchs, D., & Croft, K. D. (2013). Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women. Food & Function, 4(1), pp. 111-5. doi:10.1039/c2fo30186e.
    Hodgson JM, et al. Short-term Effects of Polyphenol-rich Black Tea On Blood Pressure in Men and Women. Food Funct. 2013;4(1):111-5. PubMed PMID: 23038021.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women. AU - Hodgson,Jonathan M, AU - Woodman,Richard J, AU - Puddey,Ian B, AU - Mulder,Theo, AU - Fuchs,Dagmar, AU - Croft,Kevin D, Y1 - 2012/10/05/ PY - 2012/10/6/entrez PY - 2012/10/6/pubmed PY - 2013/5/28/medline SP - 111 EP - 5 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - There is increasing evidence that black tea polyphenols contribute to vascular health. We have recently shown that regular ingestion of polyphenol-rich black tea over 6 months results in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, the time course of these effects remains unclear. Therefore, our objective was to determine if short-term effects of tea on blood pressure could contribute to longer-term benefits of regular tea consumption on blood pressure. Men and women (n = 111) were recruited to a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind parallel designed trial. During a 4-week run-in, all participants consumed 3 cups per day of black tea. Participants then consumed 3 cups over 1 day of either powdered black tea solids containing 429 mg of polyphenols (tea), or a control product matched in flavour and caffeine content but containing no tea solids. The 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate was measured at the end of the 4-week run-in (baseline) and again during the 24 h intervention period. The 24 h day-time and night-time blood pressures were not significantly different between tea and control (P > 0.05). Baseline-adjusted net effects on mean 24 h ambulatory blood pressure for systolic and diastolic blood pressure were -0.2 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.5 to 1.0), P = 0.72, and 0.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.0 to 0.9), P = 0.95, respectively. Heart rate was significantly lower for tea compared to control during the night-time and early-morning periods (-2.0 (95% CI, -3.2, -0.8) bpm, and -1.9 (95% CI, -3.7, -0.2) bpm, respectively; P < 0.05 for both), but not during the day-time. These results suggest that the longer-term benefits of black tea on blood pressure are unlikely to be due to short-term changes. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23038021/Short_term_effects_of_polyphenol_rich_black_tea_on_blood_pressure_in_men_and_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c2fo30186e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -