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Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women.
Food Funct 2013; 4(1):111-5FF

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that black tea polyphenols contribute to vascular health. We have recently shown that regular ingestion of polyphenol-rich black tea over 6 months results in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, the time course of these effects remains unclear. Therefore, our objective was to determine if short-term effects of tea on blood pressure could contribute to longer-term benefits of regular tea consumption on blood pressure. Men and women (n = 111) were recruited to a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind parallel designed trial. During a 4-week run-in, all participants consumed 3 cups per day of black tea. Participants then consumed 3 cups over 1 day of either powdered black tea solids containing 429 mg of polyphenols (tea), or a control product matched in flavour and caffeine content but containing no tea solids. The 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate was measured at the end of the 4-week run-in (baseline) and again during the 24 h intervention period. The 24 h day-time and night-time blood pressures were not significantly different between tea and control (P > 0.05). Baseline-adjusted net effects on mean 24 h ambulatory blood pressure for systolic and diastolic blood pressure were -0.2 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.5 to 1.0), P = 0.72, and 0.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.0 to 0.9), P = 0.95, respectively. Heart rate was significantly lower for tea compared to control during the night-time and early-morning periods (-2.0 (95% CI, -3.2, -0.8) bpm, and -1.9 (95% CI, -3.7, -0.2) bpm, respectively; P < 0.05 for both), but not during the day-time. These results suggest that the longer-term benefits of black tea on blood pressure are unlikely to be due to short-term changes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Medicine and Pharmacology, University of Western Australia, Royal Perth Hospital Unit, GPO Box X2213, Perth, Western Australia 6847, Australia. Jonathan.Hodgson@uwa.edu.auNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

23038021

Citation

Hodgson, Jonathan M., et al. "Short-term Effects of Polyphenol-rich Black Tea On Blood Pressure in Men and Women." Food & Function, vol. 4, no. 1, 2013, pp. 111-5.
Hodgson JM, Woodman RJ, Puddey IB, et al. Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women. Food Funct. 2013;4(1):111-5.
Hodgson, J. M., Woodman, R. J., Puddey, I. B., Mulder, T., Fuchs, D., & Croft, K. D. (2013). Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women. Food & Function, 4(1), pp. 111-5. doi:10.1039/c2fo30186e.
Hodgson JM, et al. Short-term Effects of Polyphenol-rich Black Tea On Blood Pressure in Men and Women. Food Funct. 2013;4(1):111-5. PubMed PMID: 23038021.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Short-term effects of polyphenol-rich black tea on blood pressure in men and women. AU - Hodgson,Jonathan M, AU - Woodman,Richard J, AU - Puddey,Ian B, AU - Mulder,Theo, AU - Fuchs,Dagmar, AU - Croft,Kevin D, Y1 - 2012/10/05/ PY - 2012/10/6/entrez PY - 2012/10/6/pubmed PY - 2013/5/28/medline SP - 111 EP - 5 JF - Food & function JO - Food Funct VL - 4 IS - 1 N2 - There is increasing evidence that black tea polyphenols contribute to vascular health. We have recently shown that regular ingestion of polyphenol-rich black tea over 6 months results in lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. However, the time course of these effects remains unclear. Therefore, our objective was to determine if short-term effects of tea on blood pressure could contribute to longer-term benefits of regular tea consumption on blood pressure. Men and women (n = 111) were recruited to a randomised placebo-controlled double-blind parallel designed trial. During a 4-week run-in, all participants consumed 3 cups per day of black tea. Participants then consumed 3 cups over 1 day of either powdered black tea solids containing 429 mg of polyphenols (tea), or a control product matched in flavour and caffeine content but containing no tea solids. The 24 h ambulatory blood pressure and heart rate was measured at the end of the 4-week run-in (baseline) and again during the 24 h intervention period. The 24 h day-time and night-time blood pressures were not significantly different between tea and control (P > 0.05). Baseline-adjusted net effects on mean 24 h ambulatory blood pressure for systolic and diastolic blood pressure were -0.2 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.5 to 1.0), P = 0.72, and 0.0 mm Hg (95% CI, -1.0 to 0.9), P = 0.95, respectively. Heart rate was significantly lower for tea compared to control during the night-time and early-morning periods (-2.0 (95% CI, -3.2, -0.8) bpm, and -1.9 (95% CI, -3.7, -0.2) bpm, respectively; P < 0.05 for both), but not during the day-time. These results suggest that the longer-term benefits of black tea on blood pressure are unlikely to be due to short-term changes. SN - 2042-650X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/23038021/Short_term_effects_of_polyphenol_rich_black_tea_on_blood_pressure_in_men_and_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1039/c2fo30186e DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -